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REALITY SEO: Keneena Fanning: Putting SEO back into Sustainable Fashion

REALITY SEO: Keneena Fanning: Putting SEO back into Sustainable Fashion

 

Drawing in customers with keyword research and colourful prints

 

Welcome to another Reality SEO episode, where I take the time to focus on real humans grappling with the Google beast, and Digital Marketing.

Of course, I love to help all kinds of business humans, but one of my favourite types to help are e-commerce store owners.

Because secretly, I long to have a shop.

I mean I have 3 already, but they don’t sell real things, like pottery hedgehogs or homemade soup.

But Keneena Fanning does have a real shop – Kablooie!

And today we’re going to learn all about it and discuss the highs and lows of walking her fashion label down the SEO runway.

 

 

About Keneena Fanning

 

Lover of colour, words, puns, pattern clash, donuts – and – definitely not a perfectionist, Keneena Fanning is the creator, designer, and owner at Kablooie Store.

Kablooie is her sustainable Australian fashion label, full of colourful, quirky HAPPY pieces.

Keneena is a married mum of three, who has worked in economics, strategic financing, and project management, and holds a business degree in economics and resources management.

True story.

Keneena can tie a lolly snake into a knot with only her tongue. (But it has to be an Allen’s lolly though!)

 

 

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Must-Have Nuggets of Knowledge

 

I discovered Kate a few years back and after relentlessly stalking her various business incarnations, I was lucky enough to attend one of her in-person events which turned out to be life-changing, and not just because I met the hot Australian guy I intend to marry.

 

Kate takes complicated, arcane, and unknowable ideas and translates them into English.

 

Okay, maybe not the Queen’s English, but the kind a lowly American in-house corporate copywriter and marketing strategist like me can understand.

 

I listen to “Recipe” every morning on my drive into work and by the time I walk through the door, I’m like a pixie on acid, chomping at the bit and ready to write words to sell stuff.

 

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Transcript

 

Kate Toon:
This episode of the Recipe for SEO Success is proudly supported by Supermetrics.

Building an SEO report from scratch takes hours of manual work. A large chunk of that time goes to copy/pasting data from Google Analytics, Google Search Console, and SEMrush.

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You can start your free 14-day Supermetrics trial at supermetrics.com/try/seo-sucess

Kate Toon:
Welcome to another reality SEO episode, where I take time to focus on real humans, grappling with the Google beast and digital marketing. And of course I love to help all kinds of business humans, but one of my favourite types to help are e-commerce store owners, because secretly I long to have a shop. I have three already, but they don’t sell real things. Just resources, courses, digital templates. I want to sell real things like pottery hedgehogs or homemade soup. I just can’t think of anything to sell. But Keneena Fanning has a real shop, Kablooie, and today we’re going to learn all about it and discuss the highs and lows of walking her fashion label down the SEO runway.

Kate Toon:
Hello. My name is Kate Toon. I’m the head chef at the Recipe for SEO Success, an online teaching hub for all things related to search engine optimization and digital marketing. And today I’m talking with Keneena Fanning. Hello, Keneena.

Keneena Fanning:
Hi Kate. Thanks for having me.

Kate Toon:
It’s lovely to have you here. And so we’re going to be talking all about your business today and to give the listeners a little bit of a lowdown on who you are and what you do. I’m going to awkwardly read out your bio while you look at me. Are you ready?

Keneena Fanning:
Awesome.

Kate Toon:
Okay. So Keneena is a lover of colour, words, puns, patterns, clash and donuts, and definitely not a perfectionist. Keneena Fanning is the creator, designer and owner of Kablooie store. Kablooie. I’m going to spell that out for you. K-A-B-L-O-O-I-E is her sustainable Australian fashion label, full of colourful, quirky, happy pieces. Keneena is a married mom of three who has worked in economics, strategic financing, project management, and holds a business degree in economics and resources management. True story, Keneena can tie a lolly snake into a knot, only with her tongue, but it has to be an Allen’s lolly. That’s a bit rude. I think that’s a rude personal skill. It’s a very, very cool skill.

Keneena Fanning:
Tying a snake into a knot, it’s one of the things I’m most proud of.

Kate Toon:
Yeah. I can do that thing where I make my tongue go into like a… I can do that. Look.

Keneena Fanning:
Oh, I can’t do anything with my tongue. I’ve got the genetics thing where, it’s just –

Kate Toon:
Ah, okay. Well the podcast listeners didn’t see me do that. It’s probably a good thing, because I would lose them immediately. But you can go to the show notes for this episode and see a picture of Keneena in one of her frocks that she’s wearing today. I actually own a few Kablooie pieces.

Kate Toon:
But today we’re going to talk about your business and SEO, but also CRO, what it’s like to have a store, all those kinds of things. Before we get stuck into your SEO journey, tell me, when did you start Kablooie and why? I mean, reading out that little bio with like, I have a degree in this and I’ve done economics and I’ve done all of that. It doesn’t seem the logical next step. So why did you start Kablooie?

Keneena Fanning:
I was looking for something to do, which sounds weird. I was on maternity leave with my first child, had a second child while I was still on maternity leave. So I was a bit indecisive and then I didn’t want to go back. So I was really looking for something, a job that I could, I guess, bring into existence and do from home. I wasn’t particularly looking at fashion or design or anything because as I said, I came from economics. But I got a sewing machine and I started sewing stuff for my kids. And then it’s the story that everyone says, of you should sell that on Etsy. So I gave it a go and that’s how I started. So it wasn’t like a big dream of, I must make things or I must design things. It just grew from wanting to have a job that was different to the one I had.

Kate Toon:
I love that. That’s actually incredibly reassuring because you see a lot of people with online stores and they’re like, “Yes, ever since I was five years old, I’ve wanted to have a fashion brand. And I was making clothes when I was two.” And I’m like, oh God, I don’t have this burning desire to do anything like that. My business is exactly like yours. It was so I didn’t have to go and work for the man again. And I found something I was relatively good at and turned it into a business. So that’s actually incredibly reassuring. So did you actually start on Etsy?

Keneena Fanning:
I did. I did a one page business plan and I opened up an Etsy store and I knew nothing about business. I knew I needed an ABN, but that was where I started with maybe five listings, little girls’ skirts, like one product. Even from the start, I knew business process and simplicity was probably what I wanted to do. I didn’t want to start something that I was going to have trouble wrangling a profit from.

Kate Toon:
Yeah. And so, you started out there and I love what you said that you didn’t know how to run a business, even though you’ve got degrees in economics and you’ve been a project manager. Same as me. I was a project manager in agencies, but running your own business is entirely different. So how long ago was that? How long ago was that little Etsy store?

Keneena Fanning:
That is six years ago in May. So yeah, just over six years ago now.

Kate Toon:
And just to give people an idea of where you are now, how would you describe your business now? I mean, obviously there’s not three listings on Etsy anymore. How is it now? Do you deliver all over the world? How many products do you have? Tell us a little bit about your business now.

Keneena Fanning:
So from that little Etsy store with five or so listings, I now have my own e-commerce website and I deliver internationally. The majority of my customers are in Australia, but I have New Zealand, Singapore, Asia, Europe, America, and I have a range of handmade to order, colourful, quirky ladies clothes that go from size four to 26, which is all about having an inclusive brand. So people want a cool, colourful dress, they should be able to get it in their size. That’s the bottom line.

Kate Toon:
Yeah. That’s the mission statement, which I love. I think that’s fantastic. And your pieces, they’re not fast fashion. They are bespoke, handmade. I’m going to say it, they’re not cheap. They’re reasonably priced. So, now is this business at the point where it sustains you? You’re never going to have to go back and work for the man. Is that true? Are you there?

Keneena Fanning:
Yes. So, I think last year or the year before, I got to the point where I was actually earning more with my profit from the business than I was with my middle management job in the public sector, which was a bit of an amazing moment where I said to my husband, “Look, I did it.”

Kate Toon:
It’s such a great moment. And I think lots of people listening will be envious of that. And obviously what they want to know is how did you do it? So we’re on an SEO podcast. One of the things we’re going to talk about is SEO, but let’s just cover some basics first of all. What e-commerce platform did you choose? What platform is your website on?

Keneena Fanning:
I’m on WordPress with WooCommerce.

Kate Toon:
See, there you go. That’s interesting isn’t it? So everybody, these days is all Shopify, Shopify, Shopify. So I’m really excited that you’re on WordPress. All my shops are on WordPress as well. And obviously one of the things we love about WordPress is it’s so fiddleable withable. You can fiddle with an awful lot of it, which has both positives and negatives. So you were on my SEO course a while ago. What made you think, I want to learn about SEO? Why did you think that was going to help you in your business?

Keneena Fanning:
I think when I first started, I went from Etsy to a free platform, which is now defunct. I thought it would be a good idea to start with something free because I didn’t want to have too many fixed costs. And then when I finally moved to WordPress, I started to realise that all of my sales were still coming from my social media marketing. And I felt like I didn’t really exist in any world other than Instagram. And I knew that I needed to exist somewhere other than that, to be able to have a sustainable business. I think about three or four years in, I realised if I wanted to do this long term, it wasn’t going to be just about getting the surge in Instagram sales every three weeks. I actually needed to have a constant, ongoing eyes on my site, more people, new people. Yeah. So SEO was a gradual realisation of what it was. At first, I had no clue. It was like talking to my ten-year-old about Minecraft. What is it?

Kate Toon:
Great analogy.

Keneena Fanning:
What do you do though? Who’s it for?

Kate Toon:
I remember playing Minecraft really early on and just being like, I don’t got it.

Keneena Fanning:
And it’s so boxy though. Why doesn’t it look nice?

Kate Toon:
SEO is pretty boxy too. So, you were a diligent student. I remember you from back in the day, you asked good questions, I think. What was some of the early realisations you had about SEO? What were some things that you learned in the early days, that were like, ooh, I didn’t know that.

Keneena Fanning:
I think, one thing I didn’t realise was how focused on the customer journey it really was, how human focused. I think that’s some words that I learned from you. I mean, there’s a lot of technical stuff, which was the bit I was scared of, but the fact that it was really about how do I meet people’s needs properly with my website? How do I show them that I’m what they’re looking for? That was the biggest realisation where everything clicked as to why I was doing all this stuff.

Kate Toon:
I think that’s so true. I think, one of the things we talk a lot about on the course are the different types of keywords, and just the real notion that there are such things as conversion keywords, that there are certain keywords that are more likely to generate a sale than others. And I think people don’t think about that. Of course, the million dollar question I always get asked is, what keywords should I use for this product? Should I go with colour first, brand first, size first, gender first, material first? And that’s one of the things we run through. Actually, I have a separate module on the course, which is all around e-commerce SEO. So what’s your approach to keywords for product pages? How do you decide what to name your products and how do you then use keywords within those product descriptions to get them found?

Keneena Fanning:
Some of it, I feel like it’s a bit retrospective, because I’d already named a lot of products before I started thinking about SEO, but we’re in the middle of a rewrite of a lot of our products now. And one of the things I’m paying attention to is I have a Facebook group of about 4,000, a bit over 4,000 people. And I’ve done a few surveys in there saying, what did you search for to find Kablooie? That was just a start for me. I thought it was more useful to research the people that actually buy my products. And I got a huge list of keywords and some things that were really helpful that I started to build in that I didn’t have. And I also looked at what people were searching for that were already coming to my site and how I could better optimise for that.

Kate Toon:
It’s such a simple question, that so few people ask, which is, what did you search for to find me? It’s something I recommend a lot of people have, especially if you’re a service-based business, you have it on your contact page, because literally, people only searched for you a few minutes ago. So they remember what they searched for. Was there anything surprising in that? I guess a lot of those searches would have been not necessarily product based, but more category based, like, colourful clothing for plus sized women. Was it that higher level or was it really deep? I want a blue dress with clouds and rainbows on it. How does it split out?

Keneena Fanning:
Yeah, there were a lot more high level searches, which were really helpful for my about page and my homepage. Things like particularly the plus size and curvy clothing. There was a lot of stuff around handmade because that’s, I guess a subgroup of the people who I appeal to. One that really surprised me actually was people would often come when they were searching for Gorman clothing, which is an Australian brand, which I guess I have a similar style, big oversized, colourful prints, but quite a few people were looking for brands like Gorman. That is really interesting.

Kate Toon:
It is because it’s that branded search, that someone else’s brand, how on earth do you capitalise on that? Because it’s not like they are not going to buy from Gorman. They’re probably still going to buy from Gorman, but they want more Gormanesque brands. Do you know what I mean? And that’s like, you’re not trying to steal Gorman’s traffic, but you’re trying to show, yeah, we’re similar. So, that’s a challenge. How on earth do you work that into your site? Are you like, do you love Gorman? You’ll love us too.

Keneena Fanning:
I did try to work one little question into my about page. I didn’t want to make it too obvious because it felt like an awkward question, but I actually found a few of the searches that Gorman was coming up for consistently as well. And I don’t think I’m going to be able to compete with them, but things like quirky fashion is something that I’ve started ranking for better, and not just using quirky fashion, but making it, what is it? More of a long tail. So using that and then adding on a few terms so that I’m trying to appear in the same sort of searches.

Kate Toon:
Yeah. I love that. I mean, I think lots of e-commerce store owners think in a very single-minded way. They think of the individual products. This is a black dress, size whatever, with embroidery, and they don’t think about that category. But also something I like about your brand is you actually do some values based keywords as well. Like you mentioned the different sizing, the diversity, the sustainability, the handmade, the ethically sourced material. People, I think these days are buying on values as well as just what you literally sell. So you work that through your  social media really, really well. It’s been a while now since you did the course and obviously your brand is much better known. Are you noticing now an increase in people actually searching for your brand? So they’re not searching for what you do, they’re actually searching for who you are.

Keneena Fanning:
Yes, actually, because I think when I started, there were searches for Kablooie, which were mostly probably my mom, but now, I have noticed there’s a lot more people who search for Kablooie clothing or Kablooie Australia when I get that monthly Google report. Yeah. Overall, I just have so much more organic website traffic actually, compared to when I started.

Kate Toon:
And I think as well, as I said, I remember you from back then and I remember searching for your brand name, and back then you did not own the homepage of Google, but now you fully own it. You’ve got your six site links, your Facebook, your Instagram, the Pinterest is there. Then it’s your logo, it’s your images. And then related searches that are coming up now, are like Cotton On and The Iconic. So Google is thinking that you are other Australian fashion retailers included. But that’s taken you a while to get there. When you first started, we talked about that brand name as well, because you picked something a bit odd and some of the other things that come up for Kablooie are things like Hamster Huey and his gooey kablooie. When you were thinking of that brand name, I don’t think you were thinking about SEO, where you?

Keneena Fanning:
No, that was back in the days when SEO didn’t exist for me. And I must admit, if I had known about it before I started, I probably wouldn’t have picked that brand name at all. By the time I realised that it was a bit tricky for people to say and speak and type in without spelling wrong, I think the brand was a bit too strong, particularly on my social media. It was recognisable there, so I just went with it.

Kate Toon:
Yeah. And I think there’s pros and cons. When I talk about brand names, I say they should always be relevant, available and memorable. Relevant, maybe not. Available, it was. Memorable, it definitely is. My partner has a similar problem. He calls his business, VoulezVouloz. He’s a French tutor. No one can say it. No one knows what it means, because it doesn’t actually mean anything. And it’s caused us no amount of headaches, but people remember it. And once you remember it, once you get it, there’s something about once you get it, once you can spell it, then you feel like you’re in the inner sanctum. So it can have pros and cons. And you’ve worked towards that.

Kate Toon:
Keyword research, content audits, and gap analysis are important for SEO success, but they’re boring and time-consuming as hell. Doing the same steps over and over again is not fun at all.

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Kate Toon:
For somebody who’s listening, who has an e-commerce store, obviously you don’t want to give away all your secrets, but what are some of the things you’ve done to really try and improve your SEO since you started?

Keneena Fanning:
I think one of the biggest changes that I’ve made, which is more of a mindset change as well, and it’s directly from doing the course, actually, this was one of the things I found hardest to do. It was like a wrench. I was like, I don’t want to. It was completely changing my menu structure and my home page.

Kate Toon:
Oh, the arguments we had about that. Could you please actually tell us what you sell on your homepage? Could you? Could you? She was like, “Nah, I’m not doing it.” So yeah.

Keneena Fanning:
Yeah. The realisation that rather than my homepage being about me, trying to tell everyone, everything that I want them to know, that the menu structure and the homepage is about people being able to find what they want, that’s a big mindset change. And once you realise that’s what it’s actually about, it makes a big difference. So my menu and my homepage and my about page, everything actually looks completely different to pre-the course, probably unrecognizably different. A big thing is about having a product based menu, which I didn’t have. I just had one button that was for the shop and everything else was about me.

Kate Toon:
You big egocentric. No, I love it.

Keneena Fanning:
And then, actually looking at how many clicks does it take if someone’s landing on my website? How many clicks before they can shop something? So that’s something I’m still working on, but I think it’s a lot better than it was.

Kate Toon:
Yeah. It’s all a work in progress. What I like about what you’ve done is you’ve moved a lot of the, I guess, boring stuff, that’s not essential for that first time visitor, up into the admin nav and into the footer. So it’s there, but it’s not prominent. The nav is now fully product based. And so really quickly I can see that you sell dresses, tops, skirts, pants, breastfeeding tops. You’ve got accessories. I can choose to shop by designer, collection. There’s a lot in there. I can get gift cards. So, straight away I see the breadth of what you sell. And I think another thing that you do really, really well, both on your site and in your social media, you just mentioned it, that it’s almost like a negative, that it was all about you, but you are in your brands.

Kate Toon:
And one of the things I always say to my members of the Digital Master Chefs is give me a reason not to buy it from K-Mart. And this is a problem that a lot of fashion brands have is that someone somewhere, we won’t mention the names of the brands, is looking at sites like yours and stealing the designs and then selling. You’ve had that happen a couple of times, your designs popping up on third party sites?

Keneena Fanning:
Yeah. On the spam sites, like the Asian ones that don’t ever actually send you the right thing. But yeah, lots of my pictures on there.

Kate Toon:
I’ve been victim of one of those, because what they do is they take a photo from a reputable site. They put it on their site and then it arrives. And it’s like the thing I got-

Keneena Fanning:
It was plastic.

Kate Toon:
Yeah, exactly. Or it’s like that big, like on Wish or something. And also your site, obviously your brand is very colourful and that flows through everything as well. But another thing that I think you do very well is you don’t just optimise for the first time visitor. It’s not all about that first sale. Because I’d say, knowing your business well, a lot of your customer is repeat custom. So what are some of the tactics that you’ve used to build that loyalty and repeat purchase?

Keneena Fanning:
I think one of the biggest things, or two biggest things, my email list and my private Facebook group. They’ve both grown quite substantially. My Facebook group the most, but the email list is gradually getting there because I do try to add real value and treat the people who are in those two groups as my VIPs. So they do get quite a lot of benefits. They get secret vouchers that other people don’t have access to. It’s not like I just say, no one else will see this and then broadcast it to the world. It’s just for them. And so people come and they stay and then they invite their friends, and those friends invite friends. So it started out, my Facebook, it was 30 people, just doing little, on the side, custom runs, things that no one else had access to. And now, like I said, it’s more than 4,000 in the last couple of years.

Kate Toon:
It’s amazing, isn’t it? But I love it. It’s a risk to have offers that are only available to that small group and to keep those exclusive because a lot of people do that. And then a month later everyone gets it. And it’s like, well, I don’t feel special. Another member of Digital Master Chefs who does a great job of that is Lou Duggan from Cakes 2 The Rescue. I think that loyalty comes from A, having a great product that people want to buy again, B, having really good customer service, but most people stop there and they just think, well, that should be enough. But it is offering incentives. Why do I get a 10% discount when I first buy, but not when I buy for the 15th time? Surely that’s when I should be getting the discount.

Kate Toon:
I think people really underestimate that. And especially in your world where you are making, not necessarily bespoke pieces, but short run pieces. I love the fact that it’s super exclusive and I’m not going to see every person who can get to a Gorman shop, no disrespect Gorman, in the same top as me. That’s money can’t buy, isn’t it? That’s what we really want. So yeah, I think that’s fantastic.

Kate Toon:
So look, these episodes are pretty short and sweet. I think we’ve already learned a heck of a lot from you. And you’ve talked about some of the big changes that you’ve made, I guess, can you leave our listeners with a couple of tips? Like if you were starting out today or you have an established business, but you’ve really avoided SEO, what would be some tips you’d have for other store owners?

Keneena Fanning:
I think coming from where I was coming from, you do have to understand about SEO. I think the biggest thing is not to be scared by it. Doing something like your course was amazing because it does have a huge amount of information. And I had to work hard and some stuff I had to watch or read five times and just be like, eh, canonical what? But it’s just so important to know about, especially in the last 18 months, since so much more and more of the shopping journey is online with the constant lockdowns. And it’s a worldwide thing. You have to take the plunge and understand it as something as key as understanding your financials, I think. And I think once you’re in it, it’s seeing it as an ongoing journey. I hate the word journey. Something that is continuous. It’s not like a set and forget thing. It’s something I’m always having to think about. And I’ve got a constant list of jobs that I’m slowly, gradually ticking off.

Kate Toon:
Yeah. And that you’ll never get to the end of. I’m at the moment reworking my Kate Toon site. I launched that in 2009. Will it ever be done? No, it won’t. And you’re constantly learning about your customers and different ways that people want things. And you mentioned about the navigation and stuff. I’d say eight years ago, everybody just had the shop button. I think the other thing that you’ve done a great job of is, as you said, doing things that you don’t want to do, but you know you have to. A lot of people ask for advice and then don’t take it. But the other thing I think you do a really good job of is you take a very holistical, I just made that word up, holistic approach to your marketing.

Kate Toon:
So yes, you work on your SEO, but you work on your socials, you built community, you built a group, you’ve got your email list. You don’t necessarily put all your eggs in one basket. If the internet suddenly went away tomorrow, you’d still have your email list. If your Facebook group died, you’ve still got your website and your organic traffic. And I think that’s really important as well. You’ve got to do a little bit of everything. It seems a lot, but that’s what works. Unfortunately it is a lot of work.

Keneena Fanning:
It is. And I think one of the really good things about business not being primarily about just living a passion, is when it’s hard or when you fall in and out of love with it, you can still just do those things every day, because it’s about keeping the business running and sustainable and successful, not just about that I have to love it all the time. I think too many, especially handmade and creative business owners, it’s too much. I shouldn’t say too much, but there’s a lot of it that’s about loving it and chasing the passion. And if they burn out, it’s like the reason for business isn’t there anymore. I think it needs to be more about understanding how to be successful and making that your goal all the time.

Kate Toon:
I think that’s so crucial, especially as you said, with creative businesses and often it can actually be a negative to pick something that you’re so passionate about and love and turn it into your business because one way or another, you will lose some of that love for it. I’ve got a lot of creative, crafty things I like to do, like mosaics and things like that. And I’ve often thought, oh, I could get a stall. I could make them, I could sell them, but I think it would ruin it for me. So having that tiny degree of separation between your passion and your business, I think is so important because as you said, it keeps you going when the passion is gone. You get in, you do your Excel spreadsheet, you pack your orders and you don’t need to have passion every single day. It’s so important. But you do need to have good SEO every single day, every day. It’s so important.

Kate Toon:
Keneena, it was amazing hearing from you. Obviously, if we want to learn more about your business, we can go to the show notes and click on the links there, but we should also be heading to Kablooie, and checking out your fabulous range of products. And I love as well that you’re expanding your range into different things now, accessories, all kinds of stuff. So go and check out Keneena’s site. Keneena, thank you for your time today. It was wonderful to talk to you.

Keneena Fanning:
Thank you.

Kate Toon:
Ah, she’s a lovely woman. Go and check out the show notes to find out more about Keneena and her wonderful business, really lovely stuff. So I want to also thank you for listening to the show. And if you have a few seconds to leave a rating or review, you can head to iTunes, SoundCloud, Spotify, or Stitcher. That’d be great.

Kate Toon:
And I just want to thank awesomesource777 from the United States for their lovely review. They say, “Must have nuggets of knowledge. I discovered Kate a few years back and have relentlessly been stalking her various business incarnations. I was lucky enough to attend one of her in-person events, which turned out to be life-changing. And not just because I met a hot Australian guy I intend to marry.” What? That is so cool. Oh my God. “Kate takes complicated, arcane and unknowable ideas and translates them into English. Okay, maybe not the Queen’s English, whatever, but the kind a lowly American in-house corporate copywriter and marketing strategist like me can understand. I listen to Recipe every morning on my drive into work, and by the time I walk through the door, I’m like a pixie on acid, chomping at the bit and ready to write words to sell stuff. The podcast gets all the stars.” Oh my gosh. That is just the most beautiful review. Big cry. Thank you.

Kate Toon:
Thank you for listening. Thanks to Keneena and thank you to you for being ears for this show. If you want to learn more, you can head to the I love SEO group on Facebook. Thanks for listening, and until next time, happy SEOing.