Pinterest: How to use pins to boost your brand with Simone Pavils (NEWBIE)

Pinterest: How to use pins to boost your brand with Simone Pavils (NEWBIE)

Get found across the board

 

Pinterest, remember that?

I used to use it yonks ago to plan my kid’s birthday party, or to mood board my latest decorating project.

But I never took it seriously from a business point of view.
And maybe I should have done.

For those living in a hole, Pinterest is a social media platform that allows users to “pin” images and articles to their board.

People set up boards for anything from outfits to holiday destinations, makeup ideas, to dream cars.

But as well as a fun way to be creative, it can also be an incredible business tool for getting all kinds of products and services found online.

So this week we’re pinning our hopes on our Pinterest expert to tell us how to use this platform to boost our website traffic and our sales.

 

Tune in to learn:

  • Pinterest: What it is, who uses it, and how long it’s been around.
  • What makes Pinterest so valuable to businesses
  • How Pinterest can work for your service-based business
  • What being a Pinterest SEO means
  • Algorithms: Pinterest vs Google
  • How to get started on Pinterest today
  • Simone’s tips for optimising your Pinterest account

 

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And big thanks to Anu.Sawhney for their lovely review:

“Thank you for making content marketing understandable.

 

It’s helped me differentiate content marketing from scheduling, I get the purpose of it now.

 

Thanks.”

 

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About Simone Pavils

 

Simone Pavils provides trusted Pinterest and SEO services and strategy for purpose-driven women in business, to help lighten the load.

She shows you how to create perfect, SEO-optimised Pinterest profiles and pins, and improve your Pinterest strategy so that you can have organic traffic flow to your website without barely lifting a finger.

Simone can touch her nose with her tongue, and still has a baby tooth.

 

Connect with Simone

 

Useful Resources

 

Transcript

 

Kate Toon:
This episode of the Recipe for SEO Success is proudly supported by Supermetrics.

If you’re looking to analyse and report on your SEO performance, you should definitely check out Supermetrics. 

Supermetrics is a data pipeline that helps marketers bring data from the most popular marketing platforms such as SEMrush, Ahrefs, Moz and Google Search Console to their favourite reporting, analytics, and storage platforms. 

You can start your free 14-day Supermetrics trial at supermetrics.com/recipe

Kate Toon:
Pinterest. Remember that? I used it yonks ago to plan my kids’ birthday party or to mood board my latest decorating project, but I never really took it seriously from a business point of view and maybe I should have done. For those living in a hole, Pinterest is a social media platform that allows users to pin images and articles to their board. People set up boards for anything from outfits to holiday destinations to makeup ideas to dream cars, but as well as a fun way to be creative it can also be an incredible business tool for getting all kinds of products and services found online.

Kate Toon:
So this week we’re pinning, ba bum, our hopes on our Pinterest expert to tell us how to use this platform to boost our website traffic and make more sales.

Kate Toon:
Hello. My name is Kate Toon. I’m the head chef at The Recipe for SEO Success, an online teaching hub for all things related to search engine optimization and digital marketing and today I’m talking to the marvellous Simone Pavils. Hello, Simone.

Simone Pavils:
Hello.

Kate Toon:
I’m excited to have you here because yeah, I kind of think of Pinterest as a bit retro but it’s not, is it? It’s bang up to date.

Simone Pavils:
No, it’s been around about 11 years now but it is, it’s definitely changed along the years.

Kate Toon:
It’s evolved. It’s evolved. Yeah, I’m excited to reinvigorate my view of Pinterest but first of all, let me tell everybody who you are. Simone Pavils provides trusted Pinterest and SEO services and strategy for purpose-driven women in business. She helps lighten the load. She also shows you how to create perfect SEO-optimised Pinterest profiles and Pins and improve your Pinterest strategy so that you have organic traffic flowing to your website without barely lifting a finger.

Kate Toon:
Her interesting fact, I ask every guest for an interesting fact, is that she can touch her nose with her tongue. I want to see this now. We’re not going to use this video snippet but let’s see it. Come on. She did it, people! I can’t do that. I’m just going to try quickly. No, I can barely get-

Simone Pavils:
Quite far away. Yeah.

Kate Toon:
I know. What’s this bit called between your nose and your … It’s got a name.

Simone Pavils:
Upper lip?

Kate Toon:
No, I’m sure it’s got a name. Like a flugelheimer or something.

Simone Pavils:
Yeah.

Kate Toon:
I’m going to find it. If you’re listening to the podcast and you know what that little channely bit is between your nose and your top lip, then please put answers on a postcard and send them to someone else, not to me.

Kate Toon:
Anyway, we’re going to talk about Pinterest today and I think I’m going to go back to basics really because I think my impression of Pinterest is actually incorrect. I’ve always thought of Pinterest as kind of creative space to have mood boards for your latest macrame project or all the different succulents you have in your front garden. I’m not really clear that that’s what it is anymore. You are using it as a really efficient business tool. What is it? Who uses it? How long has it been around? Let’s get into the basics.

Simone Pavils:
Yeah, so we know Pinterest is a visual search engine. It’s been around since about 2009 and along those years, as we said, things have just gotten smarter and they’ve just evolved so the algorithm has gotten much smarter than it used to be and people are using it in a different way. It used to be used much like you just said, but now it’s being used to actually showcase that your business and the parts of your business that you’re an expert on.

Simone Pavils:
The users are about 70% female and they age between 18 to 49 years. About 17% are male. That’s improving. It is on the increase particularly over the years the last year. More people have turned to Pinterest during lockdowns.

Kate Toon:
Yeah. Yeah I guess we’re all doing a lot more projects. I guess obviously most people will be familiar with Instagram and maybe using Instagram. I feel like kind of Instagram came along and took away the visualness of it. That was kind of like, oh that’s the new sexy visual platform, but obviously Instagram, it’s a completely different user interface. Sorry to be basic, but for those of you who haven’t used it, obviously Instagram you publish pictures, it’s all very pretty. But Pinterest is more about curation in a way, isn’t it? Creating your own … It can be collections of your own products or other people’s. You can add anything to a Pinterest board, right?

Simone Pavils:
Yeah exactly, and it’s not just about showcasing your services or your products. It’s actually about, it’s a top of funnel platform so it’s adding that value to your users. It’s helping them in a way that isn’t just offering them a service. It’s really letting them get to know you.

Kate Toon:
Yeah. What do you feel that makes Pinterest valuable to businesses? Obviously, we’ve got two core types of businesses that listen to this podcast. E-commerce stores, yeah, that makes sense to me straight away. You’ve got a product, wack some pictures of it up on Pinterest, great. I struggle more to see how it would work for a service-based business but why is Pinterest valuable to businesses?

Simone Pavils:
Pinterest lets businesses get in front of or on top of big brands. People on Pinterest, they’re not searching for a branded search. They’re not searching for Nikes or other type of branded. They’re simply searching for white sneakers or pig outfits or dog outfits or whatever. They’re not searching for those big brands so it means that your business is able to get in front of those searches that they wouldn’t normally be able to get in front of on Google.

Simone Pavils:
The audience on Pinterest can be different. A lot of moms use Pinterest late at night once the kids are in bed. It’s really you’re able to reach a new audience as well and the content is evergreen. We know content on all the other social media platforms are very short, they’ve got a very short half-life. I think a post on Twitter lasts something like eight minutes. A post on Instagram and Facebook are around six or seven hours. It’s very short half-life and on Pinterest your content could be going for years. If it’s something that’s viral and keeps coming up and people are using those search terms continually, it’s going to keep coming up in the search results.

Kate Toon:
I love that.

Simone Pavils:
Yeah, something is going to be around forever.

Kate Toon:
I love that evergreeness because one of the frustrating and exhausting things about the other platforms is the constant need to generate more content or go back to your archives and repurpose and republish and it just feels relentless and then it just slides down your feed and it’s gone and you have to do it all over again. I love that.

Kate Toon:
You’ve mentioned a few times it’s like Pinterest is a search engine and again for the newbies, this is a newbie episode, we have to really understand the concept that Pinterest is a search engine, Instagram is a search engine, LinkedIn is a search engine, Google is a search engine. Pinterest is almost its own little kingdom. It has a search function. It works in the same way. It’s still keywords but what I loved about what you said there is you can compete against the big brands and they won’t necessarily dominate. We’ll talk more about how you kind of make your Pinterest board the best Pinterest board and the ranking factors, but we’ll come into that.

Kate Toon:
Now I touched on this earlier, as I said I can see how Pinterest works great for cooking sites, interior designers, e-commerce stores. When I was on it, you can still go and find my woeful Pinterest board. You should go and check it out, Simone. If you type in Kate Toon and I think you will find my copywriting Pinterest board from about 11 years ago and I didn’t really have any idea what to post. I think I was posting quotes and crap. I don’t know. How does it work for service-based businesses?

Simone Pavils:
You know how you publish all these blogs? A lot of people are publishing blogs, podcasts, vlogs, and they just sit on your website and hopefully if you are using the right keywords and you’re using the correct SEO, they will get shown to somebody in the Google search. Pinterest allows you to double up on that. Make pinned images for that core piece of content, that value content, and pop it on Pinterest. Get people to trust you, get people to know you, become an expert in your industry by showcasing your knowledge, and yeah, basically it’s just doubling up on your blog’s content pretty much.

Kate Toon:
Yeah, so rather than just having that blog be indexed by Google, you’re popping it into Pinterest as well and putting it into almost like a whole new index. Just as we would say try and make a video of your blog and pop it onto YouTube. You’re just finding another outlet for it. It’s kind of a social media platform, kind of a search engine combined.

Kate Toon:
You call yourself a Pinterest SEO, like a Pinterest SEO consultant. What does that mean for you? This question ties in the next one that I was going to ask, which is around the algorithm. What are some things we need to consider when we’re thinking about Pinterest SEO as opposed to Google SEO?

Simone Pavils:
Yeah, so the Pinterest keywords are a little different to those that are on Google. For example, we know that there are a couple different user intent when they’re searching on Google. If somebody’s looking to buy something they’re going to use the word “buy” on a Google search. But that’s not necessarily what people are searching for on Pinterest and so you really need to optimise your Pinterest account for Pinterest. It means doing your keyword research on Pinterest and then optimising your full profile, including your Pins, pin design, your pin descriptions, your pin titles with those keywords.

Simone Pavils:
I help people to do that. I help them to optimise their Pinterest account so that Pinterest shows your content to the right audience.

Kate Toon:
Are there keyword research tools within Pinterest or do you literally just use the tool and kind of see what comes up?

Simone Pavils:
You do. You use Pinterest itself. You can use the search toolbar, or the search bar, sorry, and just start typing in your main keywords into there and see what comes up. But there are other tools that you can sort of use back of house including the Ad tool. It’s a bit complex but it is possible to use that to do some keyword research.

Kate Toon:
Oh so you can do paid ads on Pinterest?

Simone Pavils:
You sure can. Exactly.

Kate Toon:
Oh I didn’t know that. Okay.

Simone Pavils:
Yeah, and they’re a bit more affordable than Facebook Ads as well. I’ve seen very little spend for some good results on Pinterest.

Kate Toon:
Do you know anything, you might not, you might have to go off and Google it, but do you know anything about the kind of market share of Pinterest? Do you know how many people are using it? You mentioned that it’s mostly women.

Simone Pavils:
Yeah.

Kate Toon:
I can’t even remember what the ones on Facebook or Twitter are. Maybe we’ll find that out and add it to the show notes. I’m just interested in where it lives in the ecosystem of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, the percentage of humans actually using it day by day. I think that would be interesting.

Simone Pavils:
Yeah, so I think it’s around 400 billion. Sorry, 400 million. Sorry.

Kate Toon:
Okay cool.

Simone Pavils:
400 million users, but there’s 200 billion posts on Pinterest.

Kate Toon:
Wow.

Simone Pavils:
Sorry, a lot of posts. Yeah, there’s actually a lot of users. Then obviously it ranks I think around third.

Kate Toon:
Wow.

Simone Pavils:
I think Facebook, Instagram, and then Pinterest. I believe.

Kate Toon:
Isn’t it funny, I’ve obviously just compartmentalised it in my brain as something that I’m too busy for, that’s not my social media platform, and there’s this whole other world of Pinterest users doing the do.

Kate Toon:
Look, if I were to get started on Pinterest today, if I was about to just completely start from scratch, what would be your top three tips for starting out?

Simone Pavils:
Yeah. I’m going to say keyword research again. I’ve repeated that so many times but it’s so important to do your keyword research on Pinterest using the search bar, using the Ads tool if you can to pick up some keywords. Then optimising your account, so across your account optimising your profile name, your profile description, your board names, your board descriptions, and then your pin titles and your pin descriptions as well. In addition to things like the actual picture, the image you’re using, the text overlay as well. Then being consistent. There used to be a time where we were told to post 50 pin images a day. That time has long gone. It’s not necessary anymore. Really what it’s about now is being consistent. If you are only able to post one pin a day and you’re consistently able to post one pin a day, then that’s amazing. I think people get caught up in how many pins do I need to post a day, but really the number is as many as you consistently can post.

Kate Toon:
Yeah, and there’s going to be people doing more than you and people doing less than you. Sorry, I just want to revisit the bits you can SEO. Obviously in on page optimization we talk about a title, the meta, the H1. You mentioned there your account name. Could you go through those again just slowly?

Simone Pavils:
Yeah, sure. We’ve got your account name, so your profile name that you use. It’s actually possible to use a pipeline between each of the keywords and so you can have the main keyword for your industry or your business and then you can follow it up with your business name and then maybe even one other keyword depending on how much you can fit in there.

Simone Pavils:
Then you’ve got your profile description, and in there you might want to actually say what your name is. A lot of people will, if your name is your brand, for example, yourself, then obviously you’ll put that in the actual title. But if it’s not, then I would just put your name in the description. A lot of people, they’ll put their name in the title when their business name is something completely different. Put your name in the description and then add some keywords in there as well. But you need to optimise human first, the same as Google. You want to make sure that is reading nicely but it’s just optimised with several keywords.

Simone Pavils:
Then you head over to your board names. Okay? A lot of people miss their board descriptions. In your board names, the same thing. You can add two keywords that are sort of relevant but maybe a little bit different with a pipeline in between them and then in your board descriptions, which lots of people miss doing, you want to list several keywords in there. Don’t keyword stuff. We hate keyword stuffing, but make it flow nicely to do that.

Simone Pavils:
Then lastly we look at the pin, the actual pin that we’re pinning. We want to have the title keyword optimised and also the description keyword optimised. Then we don’t know for sure but we assume that Pinterest reads the text overlay and so we also optimise that with a keyword as well.

Simone Pavils:
It’s important to note that while you can optimise all of this on Pinterest, you also need to optimise your website.

Kate Toon:
Yeah, yeah, that leads back to it.

Kate Toon:
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Kate Toon:
This isn’t a question I was thinking I was going to ask but I feel like I’m so out of the loop with this and I’m asking the newb questions. With Pinterest, I put together my board, I put together my account, I’ve got my different boards and I’m putting my content up there and I assume that you would follow a similar content pillar kind of strategy. I’m going to post tips, I’m going to post this, same content strategies you would maybe on Instagram or something else. How does engagement work? I know this is a really basic question. Can I comment on people’s pins? Can I comment on people’s comments? How does engagement work with Pinterest?

Simone Pavils:
Yeah, this is actually something that surprises a lot of people because Pinterest changed last February to wanting fresh content, which meant that you really needed to start reducing the amount of other people’s pins that you’re repinning and focus mainly on pinning your own pins. But the platform is meant for engagement so you need to be still engaging as a human. You can’t just be uploading your pins and thinking that that’s going to work as a strategy.

Simone Pavils:
A couple of times a week at that sort of seven to nine time, maybe even later, think of the times that you as a mom or as a person that has free time in the afternoon goes on and starts interacting with the platform, you can leave comments on some video pins and story pins and you can actually click the little emoji button as well. There’s a little emoji button on some of the video content and the story pins. Click those, interact with people, leave little comments saying, “I love your content. Thanks for sharing.” Pinterest is actually going to start saying that interaction and all together it’s like a recipe for success.

Kate Toon:
Ba boom.

Simone Pavils:
Yeah.

Kate Toon:
You just said something that I didn’t know, again. I sound like such a thicky. I didn’t know you could do video pins. You couldn’t back in my day, back in 1842 when I was using Pinterest. You can share video snippets. Is there a limit on the length of those like with Instagram?

Simone Pavils:
Yeah there is. They roughly like one minute video content. You really don’t want to be heading over that because somebody’s not going to sit there and watch any longer than that anyway. Then you can actually do story pins as well and those can have 20 slides to them with each slide having a one minute video on them as well.

Kate Toon:
Wowsers.

Simone Pavils:
Yeah. Both video pins and story pins, Pinterest is really favouring at the moment.

Kate Toon:
It just seems like all the platforms are homogenising. Twitter now has Fleets, you can have little stories there. They’re all kind of offering the same bits. They’re all seeing what each other’s are doing and I guess even me listening to this, I’m like, really? I have to do Pinterest as well now? I was just thinking maybe I was going to start with my TikToks and my Reels and now LinkedIn is … Oh my goodness. Anyway, but I guess there’s some degree of reusing across the platforms. The stories that you make for Instagram you could transfer over to Pinterest. Do you think there is cross purpose there, across – ?

Simone Pavils:
Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. With your content plan, I think this is a really important thing to start with, have your core piece of content. You do your keyword research, you come up with your topic idea. You have your piece of content which is either a podcast or a blog or a vlog, and then you whittle down the latter and split the content up. Use a quote here, get a snippet here, and use it across all the platforms. One of those things you can do is obviously with a Reel or a story that you use on Instagram, you can also use that on Pinterest as long as some of that branding like for example the TikTok branding, Pinterest doesn’t like to see that on theirs but it’s possible to sort of clip it out anyway. You can repurpose.

Kate Toon:
Yeah, that sounds a relief. Now I guess as I said I feel like I’m a newb to Pinterest because it’s been so long since I’ve used it, but we will obviously have some advanced users on here, some people who have been using it. Do you have any tips for those people that are maybe using Pinterest already and just want to do a bit better job?

Simone Pavils:
Yeah absolutely. Taking advantage of the story pins and video pins, like I said. Then there are tools like the actual Trends tool that a lot of people don’t know about. Pinterest has its own Trends tool where you can go in and just type in a topic. For example, slow living, and it will bring you up the busiest times for that search for that topic. It might show you that in March a lot of people are searching for it or in winter-time a lot of people are looking at how to live slower. Then what you can do is you can actually make sure that you’re putting out content approximately six to eight weeks before that peak period to make sure that you’re getting the content in front of the people who are searching for it.

Simone Pavils:
Then another thing is that Pinterest and Tailwind, they both do a lot of lives, a lot of masterclasses that people don’t necessarily know about and things like story pins as well, they do these amazing masterclasses which give you all of this information. When you can, sit in on some of those as well.

Kate Toon:
Where do we find the Pinterest masterclasses? Are they fairly easy to find? Maybe we can include a link to those.

Simone Pavils:
Yeah, I’ll include a link. So there’s Pinterest business obviously has an area of their website where there’s some education parts to it. There’s actually areas in there that you can go and do a little bit of education. I will include a link for you.

Kate Toon:
Thank you. Then what about scheduling? Are there tools that will help me schedule to Pinterest? I use AgoraPulse and as far as I know that doesn’t have Pinterest. Maybe it does. I don’t even know. Do the standard social scheduling tools work with Pinterest?

Simone Pavils:
Yeah they do. I myself use Tailwind, so it’s an approved scheduler and Tailwind has stated, or sorry Pinterest has stated that there’s no difference in how their pins are distributed across Pinterest, whether it comes from Pinterest directly or from Tailwind. I do use Tailwind to schedule out my pins and what that allows me to do is at the beginning of the month I can schedule two weeks or even the month’s worth of pins and I know that they’re going out and being distributed at optimised times according to my audience.

Kate Toon:
That’s a real relief because most of the other platforms are so anti schedulers, aren’t they?

Simone Pavils:
Yeah.

Kate Toon:
Have you noticed just from your own personal experience that if you’re actually on the platform and posting versus scheduling that there is a different in engagement and popularity with the post, because I’ve found that with a lot of social media platforms like if I post the thing and I sit there, it seems to go off a bit better than if I schedule it. Do you find that happens with Pinterest?

Simone Pavils:
Not necessarily with the pins but what I like to do is with story pins and video pins, when I’m putting those out, because I do manually pin those quite ad hoc over the week, when I put those out I do like to put them out and then sit on the platform for a bit and interact with some people’s other story pins and video pins just to show Pinterest that I’m actually here. I’m on the platform. I’m using your platform as you intended.

Kate Toon:
Fantastic. Well I was going to ask you for one main tip for optimising Pinterest. I think I can kind of guess what it’s going to be. Go on. If you could just leave us with one tip, what would it be?

Simone Pavils:
Of course it’s keyword research. Doing that keyword research at the very beginning. Not just going off on a tangent and posting as you want. Yeah, I think making sure you’re doing that is-

Kate Toon:
Yes. I can still use it to plan my son’s birthday parties as well though, can’t I? Right, yeah?

Simone Pavils:
Absolutely but make sure that those boards are hidden.

Kate Toon:
Okay. Oh I think people would enjoy them. I’ve got a great one for Star Wars birthday parties if you want to go and check it out. Now we’ve got a question from one of the members of the Digital Masterchefs group, which of course Simone is a member of. She’s our Pinterest guru in the Digital Masterchefs. It’s from Krystala Her second name is amazing Charalambous and her website is Modella Clothing. She says, “Simone, I have a Pinterest account that I started years ago and I haven’t touched it ever since.” Sounds a bit like me. “Where do I start making my account work for me as an e-commerce fashion store?”

Simone Pavils:
Yeah, I think definitely that content research and content planning. Starting with making sure that the content you’re posting out is actually going to be relevant to Pinterest users. Start at the very beginning, at the very top of the chain, and do your keyword research on Pinterest, find some of those things that people are actually searching for and their pain points, make some blogs about them, and you’re going to be at a greater position and greater position than you would be if you just started at the bottom and went from just ad hoc and did whatever you want.

Kate Toon:
I’m just thinking about my woeful Pinterest account, would you recommend just trashing everything that you already have if it’s a bit old, or would you leave it there? Do you think it still has value?

Simone Pavils:
People need to remember that you can make boards secret and archive boards. If you’re finding that there’s, for example, if you used to be a copywriter but now you’re a business coach or you used to be a copywriter and now you are doing virtual assistance or something like that and it’s not so relevant anymore, then hide those boards. Don’t delete the content because Pinterest may mark you as spammy or mark you as doing something that it doesn’t like you doing, something tricky, and so just hide those boards, archive them, make them secret, but just really focus on the future. Focus on going forward. Don’t focus so much energy into what you’ve done in the past.

Kate Toon:
Well that’s a relief, isn’t it? Now one of the things that we worked on as part of the Digital Masterchefs is that you actually offer a service to go in and review people’s Pinterests and give them a bit of a spring clean. Is that right?

Simone Pavils:
I do. I do an audit service and give you a strategy session as well post that audit based on what we found on your Pinterest account. The strategy session is really just nailing down some of those things that we found and showing you how you can go and fix them. I really love auditing accounts and helping people to sort of DIY.

Simone Pavils:
Yeah.

Kate Toon:
Yeah, it’s so much fun telling people what’s wrong with their stuff, isn’t it? It’s really fantastic. I love it. Thank you so much, Simone, for filling us in. You’ve nearly convinced me. I must admit when I think about getting started again with another social media platform I feel a little bit weary but it’s been a long week so maybe I’ll have a think about it and see how it could work for me.

Kate Toon:
One thing that I’ve seen work very well is I’ve seen a lot of copywriters, graphic designers, even web developers using Pinterest for their portfolio, using it as a portfolio. Great place to share that content.

Kate Toon:
Oh, and another little tool that I’ve seen that I used to use, you can actually get a little tool and I think it’s in your Chrome browser toolbar where a little P appears and wherever page you’re are you can just click that P.

Simone Pavils:
Yeah.

Kate Toon:
Is that a thing? Did I imagine that?

Simone Pavils:
It is. No, it still is a thing. It’s a Pinterest Chrome extension. Another thing that I really recommend is putting a Pin It button on your website. If you’re able to get a plugin for a Pin It button that allows people to directly pin images from your website as well as you being able to pin all across with the Pinterest extension.

Kate Toon:
Well I might ask you as well so we can include a link to Tailwind, a link to the Pinterest masterclasses, and maybe to that Chrome tool as well because that just makes it easier. I guess even if you, as with any social media platform, it’s obviously better to have a strategy and to surround these content pillars, but even if you can just occasionally remember to pin the odd bit and bob it’s going to be better than nothing.

Simone Pavils:
Yeah exactly, and I guess if you can just consistently post three times a week then that is definitely better than nothing.

Kate Toon:
Better than nothing. Brilliant. Thank you for the permission to be a bit rubbish, Simone. That’s fantastic. Where can people find out more about you?

Simone Pavils:
Yeah, so you can find me on Instagram. I hang around there quite a bit. My handle is SimonePavils. You can find me over on Pinterest, the same, SimonePavils, Facebook and also my website, which is www.SimonePavils.com.

Kate Toon:
Consistent branding. I love it. You’ll also find Simone on Clubhouse in lots of Pinterest rooms. There seem to be oodles of Pinterest rooms on Clubhouse as well. Thank you so much Simone. That was fantastic.

Simone Pavils:
Thank you for having me.

Kate Toon:
There we go. I don’t know, maybe I’ll give Pinterest a second look. Gosh, there’s just so many social media channels. It’s overwhelming. Anyway, that’s the end of this week’s show. If you have questions about Pinterest SEO, head to my I Love SEO group on Facebook. Simone is a member. I’m sure she’ll be happy to answer any questions you may have.

Kate Toon:
As you know, I like to end the show with a shout-out to one of my lovely listeners and today it’s Anu Sawhney and she says, “Thank you for making content marketing understandable. It’s helped me differentiate content marketing from schedule. I get the purpose of it now. Thanks!” Thanks Anu for your lovely comment.

Kate Toon:
Thanks to you for listening. If you do like the show I would love it if you could leave me a five-star rating and review on iTunes, Stitcher, Spotify, or wherever you heard the podcast. Your review will help others find the show and learn more about the lovely world of SEO and digital marketing and you’ll get a shout out on the show.

Kate Toon:
Now don’t forget to head to the show notes for this episode where you’ll find a full transcript as well as some of the tools that Simone mentions and links to useful things.

Kate Toon:
Of course, if you haven’t already, check out my other show, The Kate Toon Show. It is coming back hopefully for a new series when I get around to it. It’s my personal podcast about living life as a misfit entrepreneur. My tips and advice on how to be a happier and more successful business owner. Tune in on your favourite podcast app. That’s it for this time. Until next time, happy SEO’ing.