Influencer marketing: why it’s all about relations with Marina Garbuio (NEWBIE)

Influencer marketing: why it’s all about relations with Marina Garbuio (NEWBIE)
Reading Time: 23 minutes

 

Expanding your audience reach with the right voice

 

Influencer marketing.

Even the mention of it gives me the heebeejeebees.

Visions of hot 20-somethings lying in a cossie on a rock in Ibiza spring to mind.  Your product lying next to them on said rock.

And oh the horror stories.
Small business owners giving away oodles of product, and splashing the cash only to be ghosted.

So how do you choose a trustworthy influencer? And how do you see genuine return on your investment?

Today we’ll talk about the positives and the pitfalls of this relatively new form of advertising, and whether it really has legs for your business.

 

Tune in to learn:

  • What influencer marketing is, and when it became a thing
  • The positives of influencer marketing
  • Which types of businesses can benefit from influencer marketing
  • How to find the right fit for your business
  • How to approach an influencer the right way
  • What kind of return on investment (ROI) you should expect from engaging an influencer
  • What measures to have in place to ensure you don’t get burned
  • Marina’s top marketing tip

 

 

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About Marina Garbuio

 

Marina Garbuio

Marina Garbuio is a Digital and Social Media Strategist at Motivating Marketing where she helps six-figure service businesses struggling to reach their next revenue bracket. 

She also is a Marketing Subject Coordinator and lecturer at RMIT University. All sized businesses come to her when they are not seeing results in their current marketing and realise they need to adapt and change, in order to successfully service more clients.

 

Fun fact: Prior to the pandemic, Marina and her mum ran a boutique tour company to Italy, where artists, cultural lovers and photographers could experience the ‘real’ Italy – off the typical tourist trail. It began with a marketing plan and lasted for 12 years.

 

 

Connect with Marina Garbuio

 

Useful Resources

 

 

Transcript

 

KATE TOON:

Influencer marketing. Even the mention of it gives me the heebie-jeebies. Visions of hot 20-somethings lying in a cozzie on a rock in Ibiza spring to mind, your product lying next to them on said rock, and oh, the horror stories. Small business owners, giving away oodles of product and splashing the cash only to be ghosted. So, how do you choose a trustworthy influencer, and how do you see genuine return on your investment? Today, we’ll talk about the positives and the pitfalls of this relatively new form of advertising and whether it really has legs for your business. Hello, my name is Kate Toon and I’m the head chef at The Recipe for SEO Success, an online teaching hub for all things related to search engine optimization and digital marketing, and today, I’m talking with Marina Garbuio. Hello, Marina.

MARINA GARBUIO:

Hi.

KATE TOON:

How are you?

MARINA GARBUIO:

I’m so well. And yourself?

KATE TOON:

Yeah, I’m good. I’m good. I’m going to read out your bio so everyone knows who the heck you are.

MARINA GARBUIO:

Sweet.

KATE TOON:

Marina is a digital and social media specialist at Motivating Marketing where she helps six-figure service businesses struggling to reach their next revenue bracket. She’s also a marketing subject coordinator, a lecturer RMIT University. All size businesses come to her when they’re not seeing results in their current marketing and realise they need to adapt and change in order to successfully service more clients. She’s also a popular member of my membership, The Digital Masterchefs. Now, fun fact, prior to the pandemic, Marina and her mum ran a boutique tour company to Italy where artists, cultural lovers, and photographers could experience the real Italy off the tourist trail. It began with a marketing plan and lasted for 12 years. And now, is it over, is it coming back, Marina?

MARINA GARBUIO:

No, it’s coming back with a vengeance. So, we’ve already got people that are booked, yet we haven’t finalised the tour, yeah.

KATE TOON:

Oh, that is like a dream thing for me. When I finally have more than half a day to myself, that’s something I would definitely book. Do I have to talk to the other people on the tour?

MARINA GARBUIO:

Oh, of course not.

KATE TOON:

Okay, good. Oh good. Jolly good. As long as I can kind of be there, but then opt out when I need to and just eat lots of pasta. Sounds fantastic. Now again, this makes springs to mind, pictures of influencers standing in front of the Leaning Tower of Pisa, pretending to hold it up while clutching your leggings or your soap or whatever it is that you’re trying to influence, but maybe I’ve misunderstood what influencer… I can’t even say it, let alone describe it. What is influencer marketing and when did it really become a thing?

MARINA GARBUIO:

Yeah, so it pretty much became a thing, look, influencer marketing has always been around. We’ve just never really noticed it until social media came about. So, when Instagram kind of came to its full swing, so we’re probably looking at about 10 years, and then the influencers came in, and what we found was that more people were having more people following them than actual business. That’s when businesses went, “Oh, let’s capitalise on that.” But in essence, there is a difference. There’s influencers and then there’s content creators. So, I want to separate them both. Content creators are people like you and me because you and me, we are influencers as well, but we’re more content creators. So, businesses may approach us to showcase the stuff and then can also go on their socials as well. But influencers usually, they have higher followings. Usually, anyone who is 3,000 and above is considered an influencer, but we’re probably more talking about 10,000-plus for Instagram and probably about 50k-plus for TikTok, if we’re talking about TikTok.

KATE TOON:

Okay, great. Well, I’m sure we will talk about TikTok. So, I mean, I think there’s different levels of influence, aren’t there? Some people call them micro-influencers. That’s when you’ve got smaller, but much more engaged audience. The bigger the audience, often the fear is that a lot of that audience isn’t particularly engaged, may have been purchased. So, I’ve actually been an influencer for a few brands, like Xero and Semrush and Ahrefs on this podcast because although maybe we only get 10,000 downloads a month of the podcast, it’s very engaged, people who are super interested in that topic. So, really, that’s something to consider as well. The size of the audience doesn’t necessarily mean a better result. Sometimes it can be smaller.

MARINA GARBUIO:

Exactly.

KATE TOON:

Yeah.

MARINA GARBUIO:

It’s the value. So, speaking of that, with the micro-influencers, what you want to have a look at is a 15 to 20% engagement rate for a micro-influencer, and then when you’re looking at a mid-range, 10% is really, really good, and then anything like a large following, you’re probably looking at about 3 to 5%.

KATE TOON:

Wow.

MARINA GARBUIO:

So, that just gives you an idea of what to look for when you’re looking for influencers.

KATE TOON:

Okay, great. So, we’re going to look at the audience size, then we’re going to ask for their engagement rate as well. The percentages they can pull from their insights on Instagram and TikTok. But look, before we get into more specifics of how to choose, can you just talk about some of the positives of influencer marketing. If I’ve not tried this form of marketing, if maybe I’ve been sticking with content marketing and email and SEO, why would a small business look to influencer marketing as an opportunity? What’s some of the positives?

MARINA GARBUIO:

Okay. Well, there’s the collaboration. So, it actually enables you to be associated with a particular influencer. So, if that influencer has a great following or has great ethics or great values, then your product is automatically associated with that. So, that can really work well, especially if you’re showcasing sustainability and you’re working with influencers that deal with sustainability, then it just gives your product that extra credence as well. I kind of see it as PR, the influencer marketing as such, even though sometimes you would pay, but I must admit, I’ve never actually paid influencers. I’ve managed to develop the relationships. So, when it’s a relationship, it’s more about the PR factor.

MARINA GARBUIO:

The next one is the results as well that it’s not like you can put it into a newspaper or something, and then you have no idea who’s seen it, what’s been going on. Working with an influencer, they can actually give you the stats behind the Stories, the Reels, the posts, et cetera, and we can go more into specifics about that later, but this will really help you when you’re wanting to target specific audiences, and then also the authenticity as well. So, it gives the brand exposure, and the authenticity, and it showcases your product or your service to a brand new audience that you would never have gotten to in the first place.

KATE TOON:

Yeah. So, I mean, done well, it can be hugely powerful. If that person is built up the know, like, and trust factor with their audience and they recommend a product and they have a loyal audience, there’s just this natural progression that someone’s going to move from that brand to the new brand, and that’s why for me, I’ve never done any kind of influencing really for brands that I haven’t used myself. But an interesting point you made there was that sometimes you don’t pay and sometimes you do, and that for the influencer, it can sometimes be about PR.

KATE TOON:

So, most of the influencing I’ve done, I’ve been paid for, or I’ve done it in return for product, or I’ve done it to help out my members. So, I promote Jude Socks and Bedelia Rings, and those because they’re my members of my community and I want to help them out. But also, I did do a big campaign with a brand called EasySheds where I kind of became the pinup girl for sheds. I didn’t get paid, but I got to be featured on the Today show and in various magazines. So, I liked the fact that you’ve mentioned there’s different ways of paying, and it can be as beneficial for the influencer sometimes as well.

MARINA GARBUIO:

Exactly, and I’m a big fan and I’m a big believer, it needs to be fair-fair. So, it needs to be value on both sides. You can’t expect them to do it for nothing, but then also the influencers can’t expect you to send the product and then them not showcasing it or expecting a lot of money to not feature it as predominantly as what it should. So, it has to be beneficial on both sides.

KATE TOON:

And I think it’s really important to be very clear about what you expect and what they’re going to give. So, there’s price guides, you can find them online that will say somebody who has 5,000 followers, you should be paying them about, and I’m just making this up by the way, go and check it, $150 for a Story with three frames in it. You should be paying them X amount for a 60-second Reel, how many times are they going to share that Reel, are they going to share the Reel to their Stories, is it going on their wall. You need to be very specific about what you’re getting and not just be like, “Here’s my product. It would be great if you could mention it,” because we know that some elements on Instagram work better than others. Wall posts these days are getting nothing. Reels are getting heaps. So, I think you have to be very specific in what you expect as well, don’t you?

MARINA GARBUIO:

Yeah, and it takes longer to do Reels. If it’s just a story, then that’s totally [inaudible 00:10:22] because it’s only up there for 24 hours, but if it’s a post or if it’s a Reel, a Reel takes a while to do by the time you do the makeup and kind of decide how you’re going to do it to best showcase the product, and we’re talking about professional influencers here, not someone that just gets a product and goes, “Yeah, whatever.”

MARINA GARBUIO:

I was speaking with an influencer called Emily Ward and she’s got an Instagram following of like 77k and a TikTok following of 295k. I was actually having a chat to her, and she was saying that to do a Reel and to really set it up properly takes her a good couple of hours, and it depends on the type of product. If she really values the product, then it might be a different price to a product that she’s unfamiliar with. We can get into that a little bit later, but yes. So, there’s lots of different things you can do.

KATE TOON:

We’ve talked a little bit about pricing and a little about bit about expectation and different types of… I can’t say influencers. It’s so hard. But I’m just thinking, does this kind of marketing suit all types of businesses or is it really just for product-based businesses?

MARINA GARBUIO:

Oh no, I think it definitely, well, it depends on how you define all types. I’ll give you some examples. So, if we’re talking about, products are a definite because it’s a physical thing. You can actually showcase it, et cetera. Services, people may find it to be a little bit difficult, but definitely services can be part of it. So, I’ve known influencers that have showcased gyms and yoga and teeth whitening, and these are all services that can be provided, but also, it’s about finding another audience. So, if we think of I’ve worked with a mortgage broker. What you can do is you can actually get the mortgage broker to do a collaboration with say a buyer’s advocate, two services, but it might be in the area that they’re trying to showcase their services or in another space type thing. So, that collaboration can work as well.

MARINA GARBUIO:

So, is the buyer’s advocate an influencer? Well, it depends on how many people they’ve got following them. But again, it comes back to what we were speaking about before which is how engaged is the business or the person with their audience, and if they’re really engaged with the audience, then the mortgage broker should be approaching the buyer’s advocate and doing something together that adds value to both their audiences.

KATE TOON:

Yeah. I mean, I think that’s fair. There’s the hey, there’s the unboxing, they look at me wearing these earrings, but there’s also the live or Story that just talks about a great service you’ve had. Feels a bit more like a testimonial, but obviously there’s just a slight more of a push at the end maybe to a particular call to action. So, for example, again, one another one of our members, Jo Violeta, was my mortgage broker, and I’ve gone on live, Stories and said, “It was a great experience, and blah, blah, blah, and they’ve got an offer on,” and that’s influencing as well. It’s all different forms. I think we get tied into, as I said, the attractive person lying on a rock, but it doesn’t have to be that. You get the rock, I think. So, we’re trying to find these great influencers for our business. We’re a small business owner. What are some things… We’ve talked about a few things. You’ve talked about the following. You’ve talked about the engagement, but how do we find the right person for our brand?

MARINA GARBUIO:

Okay. This is where it probably takes the longest. There’s a couple of different ways you can do it. You can go into something called tribe.com which is all almost like a broker for influencers. So, once you reach a certain level, you can go to TRIBE. This is what I call the people that don’t have time to really invest and develop relationships with their influencers that they’re just like, “I need this product out straight away. Let’s go.” So, you go to TRIBE, they’ve already investigated some people. They’ve given some stats and what they’re willing to do. So, you can go through that.

MARINA GARBUIO:

But the way that I work is working with the actual influencer directly. So, following them for a start, posting comments when they’re showcasing things. So, developing that relationship. So it’s not like a wham, bam, thank you, ma’am type relationship. It’s an actual proper relationship, and what tends to happen is that it tends to become more long-term and then it becomes more real, like what you were saying with Jo where you got to know Jo, you got to know their services, you use the services, and without Jo nudging you or saying, “Hey,” you were quite happily to showcase them and say how fantastic they are, and that’s what we want. That’s what I think is an authentic relationship right there.

KATE TOON:

Yeah. I mean, that’s a dream scenario. It’s not going to happen for most people that just… I don’t think many people will just naturally take time out of their day to just promote a brand for nothing. It’s like publishing blog content and hoping that people will share it. I think most businesses would more be in the… I mean, some people are nice, but I guess I’m talking more about how do you approach someone and who maybe hasn’t used your product or has, and say, “Hey, I would love you to actually create a piece of content for me.” So, we could wait for someone to just nicely do it. Probably not going to happen. How do we actually approach someone and say, “Would you do this?” Well, what are some of the first steps. Do we just DM them? Would you send them an email? Would you come up with a proposal for them, or would you expect them to come back to you?

MARINA GARBUIO:

No, no, definitely approached them, but because obviously with a product or a service, it’s not one day you’ve got a product and there it is. You would’ve been working on this product for a while. So, while you’re working on this product, what I would be doing is I’ll be thinking, “Right. Now, who are the type of influencers that would resonate with this product, would add value, or how can this product [inaudible 00:17:34] and their audience as well?” Once you start doing that, then while you’re working on the product and you’re working on the marketing and getting it up online, start looking for actual influencers.

MARINA GARBUIO:

So, you might find someone, and what tends to happen is that influencers tend to follow similar people in their field. So, you might have a look at their friendship groups and their suggestions. So, you’d go in and you’d have a look at their friends, you would take a look at their profile, and a lot of the times you’d be able to see how many people there are, and whether it’s a public type profile. Start following them, start responding to Stories, et cetera, just developing that bit of relationship.

MARINA GARBUIO:

Going into the DMS is a bit tricky because a lot of them get so many DMS from so many different people. So, if they’re getting DMS from you and they’ve never had that interaction with you, then you’re just another number. Okay? We want them to recognise you. We want them to see that you’ve actually paid attention as well, developing that relationship. And then, from when they start, if they respond to your Story, comment or your comment down below, that’s when you can say, “Hey I’ve got this great product,” or I wouldn’t even say that. I’d just say, “Look, I want to send you a DM. I have an idea,” and send them a DM, but once they’ve actually communicated with you. So, you’re not like, “Surprise. Here I am.”

KATE TOON:

Okay, great. Cool. All right. Thanks for that. Okay, so next we were going to talk about return on investment. So, we’ve talked about a few metrics there, but when talking about return on investment, what should I be expecting from engaging with an influencer? What are some realistic metrics? Maybe you could give us two or three.

MARINA GARBUIO:

Yeah. So, the return on investment depends on what you’re looking for. Are you looking for sales, or are you looking for brand awareness? Because they’re two different metrics. So, if it’s sales, then generally, what you can do is you can give the influencer a code, and then anytime someone uses that code, so it’s going to be, again, beneficial for everyone. So, you give the influencer a code. It might be like 10% off for their cohort, and any time that people use that code, then you can directly relate it to that influencer. So, that is a return on investment in regards to sales. If it’s brand awareness, and brand awareness is more about how many eyeballs have seen it. Okay? So, it’s not necessarily on sales straightaway. Sales are nice, but it’s not our final goal with brand awareness, and therefore, you might want to have a look at how many eyeballs were on the Stories, how many people commented, how many people came back to the website to even to take a look, and that’s what I’d be looking at when engaging an influencer.

KATE TOON:

Great. I think those are great metrics. I like the idea of a code. It could even be an affiliate code as well so that the influencer earns money that way, rather than being paid a fee, maybe gives 10% off to the buyer and 10% to the influencer. And then the brand awareness, yeah, I like that. Obviously, you can look at the engagement on the post, but you can also look, did you get a little bump in followers, you can look in Google Analytics and see if your branded search has increased so that people are actually starting to search for your brand name because this influencer has mentioned it. It’s a little bit more abstract, I think, than the direct sales, obviously, but as you said, you got to set those KPIs, those objectives before you approach the influencer. Do you just want to flog some more of the product or are you thinking about a long-term thing?

KATE TOON:

You made a comparison earlier in the show to PR which I think is really great because with PR, most people who’ve worked with the PR agency know that the first, it’s not about the first media release. It can sometimes be the sixth or the seventh media release to the same journalist that finally gets them to take notice and mention you. You got to keep on going, and with influencers, one Story one day is probably not going to have the big impact. As you said repeatedly throughout the show, it’s all about that relationship, and maybe having a campaign over a month, or maybe having content spread out over a period of time, or just creating a brand advocacy with that influencer where they talk about you regularly, not just one of. That’s what you really want, isn’t it? That’s the dream.

MARINA GARBUIO:

And I think you’ve touched on a really good point as well that it shouldn’t be your only method of marketing. This is just one touchpoint, and what we want to do is we want to create different touchpoints, and what I mean by touchpoints is different ways that people see your brand or see your product in different settings or different ways. So, you might use influencers, you obviously use your Instagram feed, might be other social medias, or you try and get into the PR, or showcase it. You might do a bit of social media advertising while you’re at it.

KATE TOON:

Yeah, exactly.

MARINA GARBUIO:

So, people can get exposed to it and not just in one place.

KATE TOON:

Yeah, I mean, I think there’s a whole thing about how you use the influencer contents afterwards as well. You need to be actively engaged, sharing that content to your socials and maybe taking the video, asking the influencer for the video so you can repurpose it into Facebook ads, or use it on your website, or share it on LinkedIn or on another platform so that you get maximum bang from your buck. So, if someone does make a Reel, ask for the download of it so that you can reshare it whenever you want to and agree that with the influencer.

KATE TOON:

Even a little thing, I was on Kochie the other day, for those overseas, Kochie is a Australian TV presenter, and he did this lovely intro for me. I mean, it’s not really influencing, it’s a bit different, but that intro of him describing me, I need to take that, download that, chop it up, I can use it in Reels, I can use it on LinkedIn. You’ve got to really think about how you’re going to repurpose your influencer content as well, and make sure that they agree to you having it and using it again again and again because they could share it once, but you could share it 10 times and you are getting the benefit of that, just associating yourself with that person. Now, we’ve talked about the positives. Maybe give us a few short tips on how we don’t get burned by an influencer.

MARINA GARBUIO:

Oh, can I tell you a story?

KATE TOON:

Yeah, keep a short, but yeah, you sure can.

MARINA GARBUIO:

Yeah, great. This didn’t actually happen to me, but this was told to me by a person I was teaching social media marketing to, and for me, this is a horror story, especially for a small business because I know small businesses do not have money to splurge around. This is going back a couple of years ago, so about pre-pandemic three, four years ago, and they were a vegan shoe company, and the vegan shoe company went out and went, “Okay, we’ve got 10 pairs of [inaudible 00:25:17]. We’re going to send them out, two pairs of shoe, $300, and we’re going to send them out to social media influencers that deal with vegan clothing,” et cetera.

MARINA GARBUIO:

So, they approach these people and they just sent them, they literally just sent them out to them and said, “Hey, here are the products. If you like them, please post them.” There was no contract. There was nothing, and no one actually posted them. So, out of the 10 people, 300 bucks, no one posted them. So, that was automatically $3,000 down the toilet, and for me, that is a real warning of why, A, you need a contract, and, B, this is the reason why you develop the relationships because you wouldn’t hurt your best friend. You wouldn’t hurt a family member, and in essence we’re human to human. So, if we have that relationship with another human being, we don’t want to let them down, and I’ve never had that issue with any of the influencers that I’ve worked with, and it was a hard lesson to learn for this company.

KATE TOON:

Yeah, I get that. I think this is often… So, I mean, the takeouts from that story I think are have a contract. How do we not get burned? Number one, have a contract. Make sure you set expectations and manage them because that’s the most often the problem that you have one expectation and the influencer has another because you’ve been too vague. So, specificity and contracts, and then follow through. If they’ve signed a contract, then you legally can enforce that contract and be aware of that, but the truth is you ideally never want to get to that stage. So, reaching out to completely random influencers who you’ve not got no relationship with and you’re just trusting they’re going to do what they say and you’re giving them big blobs of money, it’s just crazy.

KATE TOON:

Start smaller. Don’t go for the 60,000 person straight away. Start with some smaller micro-influencers. Build up, build up your confidence, and watch these people for a while. Watch how they promote other people’s products. Do you feel that it comes across genuinely? Maybe if you’ve seen them promote someone else’s product, get in touch with that business owner and say, “How was the experience of working with this influencer? Did it go well? What were the positives? What were the negatives?” Learn from that because the best advice is going to come from other people who’ve been in your situation. We’ve got a couple of success stories that we’re going to share from members of Digital Masterchefs, but when it comes to influencers, what’s one final tip you’d like to give the listeners at home before you go into the little stories?

MARINA GARBUIO:

Oh. So, one final tip would be to ask for the Stories, ask for the post, ask for the results. So, getting the analytics behind it. A lot of people do tend to forget that because they’re all wrapped up in the whole excitement of getting the influencers, seeing their product online, and then they kind of forget to get the analytics. So, definitely ask for those.

KATE TOON:

Yes, get the data. The data is the key thing. I love that. All right, we’ve got a couple of stories we just thought we might talk through at, at the end of the episode. So, the first one’s from Keneena Fanning who is a member of Digital Masterchefs, my private mentor group and her business is called Kablooie. Oh, by the way, I should mention that I’ve included a link to the TRIBE website. It’s not tribe.com. It’s tribegroup.co.

MARINA GARBUIO:

Oh, okay. Okay, yeah.

KATE TOON:

So, if you’re trying to type that in. No worries. I just thought I’d mention that in case people don’t go to the episode notes. But yeah, so Keneena Fanning from Kablooie had this little story to tell. So, she said, “Okay, so I found working organically with other brands to be more useful than just working with an influencer. I’ve collaborated with several other brands who make things that complement my dresses, jewellery, and bags, accessories, and also matching kids clothes. We’ve exchanged products and done cost promotion on Insta, via Facebook groups and then do a dual launch, and the two audiences ended up excited and purchasing from both brands.

KATE TOON:

“I’ve not paid influencers. I find it more valuable to send a couple of things to someone who absolutely personifies my brand and have them share their excitement and love for it. I don’t always even ask for a specific number of posts for those I work with regularly. One in particular has a big accessory brand, but very much leads her branding with her style and personality. So, when she shares my stuff, it has a great flow-on effect in messages, DMs, and followers. Insta is definitely not what it was with reach. So, the days of getting hundreds of new followers and sales from one influencer aren’t really realistic anymore, I don’t think.”

KATE TOON:

So, that backs up a lot of what you said about relationships. She’s not paying, she’s working with brands who have as much skin in the game as she does, beneficial to both. But what do you think about her point of Insta not delivering the reach that it used to?

MARINA GARBUIO:

Oh, so true, so true. So, and that’s what we know with the algorithm at the moment is that Reels is very, very popular. So, one thing I recommend is that the influencer does do Reels or showcases what you’ve got with the Reels, and what I love about that is that what we were speaking about before with working with other brands or other people that align with your business to get that cross audience. Yeah, I do agree with that.

KATE TOON:

Yeah, me too. Okay, the next lovely story is from Marcella Carson from Aubrey. “The biggest success I’ve had over the years has been organic.” Oh, it’s all this organic stuff, Marina. You’re on the money.

MARINA GARBUIO:

It is organic. Yeah, we should copy that.

KATE TOON:

“Has been organic influencer agreements when they have reached out to me for product because they love my stuff, and their genuine enthusiasm and sharing on page purely in exchange for products resulted in mass sales and follower growth. Unfortunately as Insta no longer offers the same organic reach it used to, a lot of influencers are now in engagement groups and comment on each other’s paid post constantly in order to try and increase reach to justify the prices being paid and to inflate their stats. So, please make sure you thoroughly research any influencer prior to paying. Look at who comments on their posts. Is it the same people each time? Do all the posts get roughly the same amount of likes? Can indicate that they are buying likes. Is there enough organic content in between their paid posts? Don’t get me wrong. There are some great influencers out there, but the minute it all became pay to play, the goal posts moved considerably, and in order to save face, keep up with what their reach used to be, there are some BTS going on to artificially inflate stats, and I hate seeing small brands get burned.”

KATE TOON:

That’s amazing advice from Marcella Carson from Aubrey. So, yeah, mentioning there to check, I’ve not heard of these engagement groups. That’s a thing?

MARINA GARBUIO:

Oh yeah, I’ve seen it, I’ve witnessed it, and totally right. So, that’s why you really need to check who you’re going with and that’s where the relationship comes in because it’s like going out on a date. After a few times, you kind of go, “Oh, something’s dodgy here. Let’s call it quits,” type thing. But there is a tool that you guys can use called Social Blade, and Social Blade, it’s free. You just get it online. It’s an extension on your Chrome, and it can tell you the engagement levels and what is happening on the social media. So, you can make more judgement in regards to whether they are the right fit.

KATE TOON:

Oh, fantastic. What a great tool to just drop in at the eighth hour. I love it.

MARINA GARBUIO:

There you go.

KATE TOON:

Social Blade, I’ve included a link to that in the show notes. So, I mean, I think the final takeouts that I’m getting from this because this is a topic I don’t know much about, even though I actually have #Bumfluencer on my LinkedIn because I do a lot of sharing of leggings, and I totally do it just for free leggings. I love leggings, or tights I think Americans call them. I really think that it’s about the relationship and not necessarily just shopping for the biggest name, but building relationships with a brand, with a person, hoping that they have genuine enthusiasm for your product so that maybe they’re willing to do it in return for product or product and a bit of money, or whatever, or there’s just mutually beneficial stuff. I mean, some of the people like Keneena, they have more followers than me. So, if I were to promote their product, and then they’re going to promote me promoting their product is actually beneficial for me as well. So, it’s interesting, isn’t it?

KATE TOON:

Well, Marina, thank you so much for your expertise today. It’s been fascinating. Where can people find out more about you?

MARINA GARBUIO:

Okay, they can find me on my website which is motivatingmarketing.com.au, but I also have a group, a Facebook group where I actually share, showcase and share social media marketing tips as well, and you can find me on Digital and Social Media Marketing Tips with Marina Garbuio.

KATE TOON:

Fantastic. Well, I’ll include links to the group, your website, your Facebook, your LinkedIn, and your Instagram in the show notes. But thanks ever so much, Marina. It’s been fab.

MARINA GARBUIO:

Been lovely. Thank you so much.

KATE TOON:

Thanks. So, that’s the end of this week’s show. If you have question about influencer marketing, then you can head to my I Love SEO group on Facebook. Before I go, I want to tell you about a little checklist that I think you’re going to really enjoy. It’s free. It’s the ultimate SEO checklist, and it helps you manage your site, and find and identify and fix some key problems. If you check out the show notes for this episode, you can grab that free and start working towards improving your ranking.

KATE TOON:

So, I like to end the show with a shout out to one of my lovely listeners today. It’s beezieferrando from Australia. What a great name. “Kate knows her SEO. Every Kate podcast, I learn something new I want to try out. Her podcasts are informative and action orientated, and she delivers them in such an entertaining way. Should I admit I have a wee crush on Kate, the wonder woman of SEO.” Oh, I love it. I actually have a picture of me as Wonder Woman. You can check it out on Instagram. I was slim. I looked good then. Not so much now. Anyway, thank you, beezieferrando, and thank you to you for listening.

KATE TOON:

If you like the show and have time to leave a five-star rating or review, I’d be incredibly grateful. Your review will help others find the show and learn more about SEO, and you get a shout out. So, don’t forget to check out the show notes at therecipeforseosuccess.com where you can learn more about engaging with influencers and your marketing, check out the useful links, and leave a comment. And finally, have you checked out my new podcast, Clever Copy Chats? We just did a brilliant episode a little while ago about SEO copywriting. If you haven’t heard it, check it out, but it’s also for business owners who just want to improve their copywriting skills as well. All right, that’s it. Until next time, happy SEOing.