Grappling Google My Business with Daniel Lamb (NEWBIE)

Grappling Google My Business with Daniel Lamb (NEWBIE)

Simple changes to deliver more customer engagement

 

By now I’m guessing you’ve probably heard of Google My Business, it’s Google’s free listing for all your business operation information including address details, reviews, posts, photos, and a whole lot more.

It pops up (for most of us) on the right-hand side of the Search Engine Results page when customers search for our brand.

But most of us are just plain lazy when it comes to Google My Business, only entering the most basic of information.

If we invest a little time and effort Google My Business can become a powerful way to increase customer engagement and ultimately make more moolah, and in today’s pod, we’re going to share 10 top tips on how to make your listing pop!

 

Tune in to learn:

Top 10 Google My Business Tips on:

  • Setting up your GMB page
  • Using the category feature
  • Responding to reviews – good and bad
  • The benefit of adding images
  • Why your information should be consistent across platforms and updated
  • Why the messaging feature is important

 

 

 

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And big thanks to victorbb7 from Australia for their lovely review:

“Love running while listening to your podcast! Good way to brainstorm and keep up with the online marketing trends. Thanks!”

 

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About Daniel

 

Daniel Lamb is the founder and CEO of the agency Holland Creative.

As a copywriter and marketing strategist, he works with coaches, course creators, and entrepreneurs alike on projects including copy & funnels, email marketing, SEO, and custom websites.

Outside of online marketing, Daniel is the host of the RITUAL podcast, an interview show all about the weird things creative people do and he’s also a damn fine guitar player.

Fun fact: Daniel is obsessed with voice impersonations and vocal “chameleonry” (addition to Webster’s coming soon).

 

Connect with Daniel

 

Useful resources

 

 

Transcript

 

Kate Toon:
By now I’m guessing you’ve probably heard of Google My Business. It’s Google free listing for all of your business operational information, including address details, reviews, posts, photos, and a whole lot more. It pops up, for most of us, on the right-hand side of the search engine’s results page when customers search for our brand through the knowledge graph. But most of us are just plain lazy when it comes to Google My Business, only entering the most basic information, if we even set up a profile at all. But if we invest a little time and effort, Google My Business can become a powerful way to increase customer engagement and ultimately make more moolah. And in today’s pod, we’re going to share 10 top tips on how to make your listing pop.

Hello, my name is Kate Toon and I’m the head chef at The Recipe for SEO Success, an online teaching hub for all things related to search engine optimization and digital marketing. And today I’m talking with Daniel Lamb. Hello Daniel.

Daniel Lamb:
Hi.

Kate Toon:
Hi. Daniel’s wearing an amazing red… Is it beanie or is it beret?

Daniel Lamb:
Yes.

Kate Toon:
Is it both? A beanie beret?

Daniel Lamb:
I think this is a proper Steve Zissou beanie.

Kate Toon:
It’s a proper beanie. I am going to take a picture for social media, I’m going to put it in the episode notes. I highly recommend you go check them out just to check out this beanie, it’s very cute. Daniel I’m going to awkwardly read out your bio now. So just sit there feeling awkward. Did you know that you are the founder and CEO of the agency Holland Creative? As a copywriter of a marketing strategy, you’ve worked with coaches, courses, creators, and entrepreneurs on projects including copy and funnels, email marketing, SEO, and custom websites. Outside of online marketing, is there anything outside online marketing? Daniel is the host of the Ritual Podcast, an interview show all about weird things creative people do. And he’s also a damn fine guitar player. Fun fact, I ask everybody a fun fact, Daniel is obsessed with voice impersonations and vocal chameleonry. Go on then, do someone. That’s put you on the spot now. Can you do them, or you’re just obsessed with other people’s?

Daniel Lamb:
A little bit of both, really. I find it really fascinating, the art of mimicry. And I would say that my favourite bad impersonation would probably be Stephen Hawking, which we were just talking about before.

Kate Toon:
Okay. Can you do him, them? Can you talk about stuff as Stephen Hawkins?

Daniel Lamb:
I can try to mimic the man.

Kate Toon:
That’s pretty good. By the end of the show, I want you to do a possible impersonation of me. I think that would be hilarious. I can’t do anybody. I can do different accents, that’s my skill. I can jump into different accents, but yeah. Anyway, let’s stop wibbling on, because today we’re talking about a really important topic, actually, and a really accessible one. So hopefully you’re going to get a lot out of this episode because we’re talking about Google My Business. What I’m going to do is we’re going to ping pong between Daniel and myself giving tip after tip. So I’m going to go first, because it’s my show. And when Daniel has me back on his show to talk about my roller-skating llama collection, I don’t really have one, but I could, he can go first.

But my number one tip is a doozy. Okay? And guess what it is. It’s to set up Google my business. I know that sounds stupid. But I read a stat by LSA insider and it said the 56% of people haven’t claimed their free listing. I don’t know why, we’re all busy people, but don’t be afraid of getting your Google my business page set up. It’s really easy. You don’t need to watch a video or a tutorial or pay for a course. It takes you through it really straightforwardly. And you just fill out all the fields. You just head to google.com/business. And I’ll include a link to where to find this in the show notes. If you’re riding a bike right at this moment, don’t stop and try and enter that in. I think the biggest fear people have is putting in their home address, but there are ways around that in terms of selecting service areas or we’re gonna be a bit sneaky about it, we’ll talk about that in a minute.

One thing I would say is for those of you who are putting an address in, whether you want it visible or not, verification is taking a lot longer during COVID. So most people opt to receive a postcard by mail and it’s taking, for people in my communities, up to three, four months to get that postcard to come out to you. But regardless of the verification, you can still access the dashboard straight away and start editing and putting things in. So Daniel, let’s talk about addresses because I think this is one of the big things that people talk about. Have you got a small human running into your office right now?

Daniel Lamb:
Indeed.

Kate Toon:
Yeah don’t worry. Because I’ve probably got a dog’s that going to come in any minute, a human. It’s all good. This is real life people. And so let’s talk about addresses. Obviously, if you’ve got an address, brilliant, you can pop it in. Some people use virtual offices, but they are cracking down a little bit on that. P.O. Boxes don’t work. Partial addresses seem to work, kind of. You don’t have to have the specific office on the specific floor that you’re in. You might get away with that for a bit, but I’m finding that Google is cracking down. They’re also massively cracking down on e-commerce stores that don’t really have a store, that they’re just servicing areas. What’s your experience with addresses and Google My Business?

Daniel Lamb:
Yeah, so when it comes to ensuring that you have your address entered and that you have your key business info in Google, there’s a few things you can do. And you’re right, they have over the last year or so and even in the past few months, gotten a little bit more stringent. For a while, we were seeing that there was no issue with having a virtual address or things like a UPS or some sort of suite number, things like that. But they’re going in the direction of labelling that as grey hat or black hat. And if you’re not familiar with that term, it’s just saying that there are certain things that are okay and cool to do for SEO and certain things that they frown upon. And so not having a physical address for certain types of business has become a bit of a faux pas. They don’t want you to do that. So even if you don’t have a storefront business, you can still enter in your address, your actual address, and claim that you serve certain areas. So for a service-based business, like a marketer or e-comm business, you can still create a profile, but they do try to make it a little bit tricky to understand their lingo.

Kate Toon:
Yeah. I think the thing is with the service areas, it’s quite easy to do now. They pretty much do it by postcode. Just don’t be too greedy. Like I see people say, oh, my service area is Australia or my service area is the world in the universe. So don’t be too greedy. At the end of the day, a lot of the time we’re hoping to get into the local pack. That would be fantastic. Maybe that’s not going to happen for you because you don’t have a specific address. It’s dead set in the centre of the, whatever the city is, but you’ll still have that knowledge graph panel pop up when people search for your brand. It’s still got value. Don’t stress too much about the address. You do enter your proper address to get the verification code, but it doesn’t have to be shown online.

So the first tip is to just literally set your Google My Business page up and don’t be afraid of the addressing. Daniel what’s tip number two?

Daniel Lamb:
So in addition to having your address entered and requesting that delightful postcard, you also need to list your other business information. So your hours of operation, your phone number, your website, those are all things that you can go ahead and create inside your profile for Google My Business. And you can also create a description for your business. So this is a place where you can also throw in some keywords. If you’ve done some research on what types of things people might be searching for. We’ll get a little bit deeper into that when we talk about categories. Basically this is your opportunity to give your elevator pitch, describe your business like you would in say a meta-description for a website.

Kate Toon:
Yeah. I love that. So what I always try and do is I call it the, your USP, your unique selling proposition. Map out who you are, what you do, who you do it for, and why you do it better than anybody else. Now, one little tip I have here is try to have a local phone number. If you have a local phone number rather than a national number or a mobile number, if you can. If you don’t have one, you don’t have one. But my tip number three kind of sounds a bit counter to Daniel’s, but it’s not really. It’s about not keywords stuffing your business name or description. So Daniel just talked about including keywords in your description. Obviously, if they make sense and it’s smooth and logical and doesn’t feel awkward, great. But if you’re shoehorning keywords in, there’s somebody here in Australia who I see, their business name is just their name, but they relentlessly keep changing their Google business name to include copywriter, excellent copywriter, affordable copywriter after their name.

Now A., your competitors can see that and they can suggest edits to Google. So that Google will change that. B., I think if you do that a bit too often, Google might take issue with you or if your profile is being flagged again and again as being incorrect, sooner or later, you’re getting on Google’s radar and believe me, you don’t want to get on Google’s radar. So don’t keyword stuff your business name or description. It’s so tempting. And it can feel like it has a big impact on where you appear. It doesn’t really, and it could end up getting you flagged as being a naughty beast or that grey hat, not red beret, but grey hat SEO. So what’s your tip number four, Daniel? I think this one confuses people. So I’m glad to hear about this one.

Daniel Lamb:
Absolutely. So when it comes to categories, you can use the category feature to ensure that your business is going to show up for the right type of service that you offer. And there’s a tonne of categories inside Google My Business. 

Kate Toon:
I think I read there’s 200, I’ve got a stat, I’ve got a stat Daniel. It’s not a stat, it’s a number. 2,395. That’s probably changed today, but it’s quite a lot. And there’s categories and then there’s sub categories, and it can feel quite hard to find the one that’s right for you, but you just have to keep digging really, don’t you?

Daniel Lamb:
Absolutely. So, start with what’s obvious if you’re just trying to poke around and see what’s there. Try to find something that fits your business pretty closely. If you can’t find something exact, think about neighbouring ideas, neighbouring things. So if, say for instance, you were in marketing and they don’t have marketing, but they might have a keyword like advertising, or if you’re a copywriter, they may not have copywriter, but they might have something like-

Kate Toon:
Business writer or website, yeah, yeah.

Daniel Lamb:
Yeah, exactly. So, don’t be married to the idea that you have to have the perfect category.

Kate Toon:
And can you just choose one category or can you be in multiple categories? I can’t remember.

Daniel Lamb:
I believe you can set a primary category and then ladder downward from there. But they do want you to pick a place to stake your claim and say this my category.

Kate Toon:
Yeah. And that’s helpful for the users. Well, remember that everything we’re talking about here is not just to please Google. Having a neat, nice, detailed description, having a clear business name, choosing a relevant category, that helps your audience go, okay, this is the right result for me. So yeah, it’s really worth taking the time.

My tip number five is to have a consistent NAP. God I could do with a nap. NAP stands for name, address, and phone number. And really we probably talk about NAPWA now, name, address, phone number, web address, or NAPWE, which I like the best, which is name, address, phone number, website, and email address. So what I mean by that is keeping that format consistent across all platforms. So if you’re structuring your address and you’re saying that we’re on level 42, suite 426, something, something ave, then that’s what it always is. Don’t change it to avenue. Don’t swap the suite for the level 4. Keep it the same, Level 42, do you remember that band? They were a really good band, probably before your time, Daniel. Anyway, I’m very old. I’m going to put a link to Level 42 in the show notes so you can go and check them out. Really good.

But yes, keep it consistent. God I’m off on tangents today, I’ve had too much coffee. And where you’re using it, so that’s if you’re listening on a directory, the address that you might have on your contacts page, the address that you might have in your footer, keep it consistent across all. Inside Local suggests that NAP inconsistency is a problem for 41% of Google My Business listing. So that’s really important to check. Write it once, keep it somewhere on your desktop. And then whenever you need to refer to your address again, just cut and paste. So that’s tip number five. What’s tip number six, Daniel Lamb?

Daniel Lamb:
Tip number six, little diversion. You should not have a NAPWE, because then you might need to change after your nap. But seriously, the sixth tip we have here today is we want to treat our services and products section actually like it’s that section on our website. So Google My Business is, in a lot of ways, it’s like a miniature website that you can build out for free on Google’s platform. And to Kate’s point, write for people, write for humans. And so when you’re describing your products and your services, you don’t need to keyword stuff. You don’t need to make it sound like spam because the more spammy things get in our copy or the more spammy things get with our approach to things, Google’s going to start flagging more accounts. They’re pretty ruthless. They love algorithm updates. And so if we’re writing for humans and we’re using natural human language, that’s a really big win.

So when it comes to products and services, this is a great opportunity. If you’re a business that offers specific products, you can think about these from an e-comm lens, you could describe your products, you can upload images of your products. If you’re a service-based business, you can have sections in your Google My Business page that outline, okay, so I’m a copywriter. What are my copywriting services? Okay. We do email, describe their packages. And so really this is just free real estate to add more detail about what you do, how you do it. And again, it is ultimately to educate users, especially on the local level, about what you do, how you do it. And again, treat it like real estate.

Kate Toon:
Yeah, totally. Now, if you think you’re going crazy and you can hear a hound in the background howling, it’s not in your bedroom, it is in Daniel’s background. So he’s got a crazy dog in the background. He’s enjoying this podcast as much as we are. So yes. Usually I have a crazy dog, but today he’s in the front garden. Okay. I’m going to jump to tip number seven. Now this tip is all around reviews. One of the best features of Google My Business is that you can use it as a place to gather social proof. Yes, you can get reviews on Facebook and other platforms, but Google reviews, I feel, carry some serious weights. So ask for reviews and respond to them. Even the bad ones. If you get a bad review, don’t think that’s going to crush your business. Instead, just be polite, practical, and unemotional, and give the customer an opportunity to talk to you.

And I’m going to clear this little script in the episode notes. And so, “Hey, thanks Bob for your review. If you’d like to chat, feel free to call on this number. Sorry that you had a bad experience.” And then give them an opportunity to make contact with you. And if you’re genuinely at fault, most people only want an apology. If you’re not at fault, come back with your rationale. Try not to sound too defensive and give them an opportunity to chat with you more. If it’s a fake review, feel free to call it out. “Hey Bob, we don’t actually have any record of you being a customer. So thanks for taking the time to review us.” Remember that most people will read the one star review first. And the first thing they do after they read that review is read how you respond to it. And if you respond to it well, even that one star review can be a win.

Another little stat for you, god knows where I found it, I don’t even have the reference. I love making up statistics. Maybe I made this one up. 44.6% of people said they would be more likely to visit a business if the owner responded to negative reviews. And the classic one we’ve all seen is that meme that says, “Hey, come and taste the worst sandwich one guy ever ate.” Turn it on its head, try and turn it into a positive, if you can. Tip number seven, encourage reviews, respond to reviews, even the negative ones. Okay. Daniel, tip number eight.

Daniel Lamb:
Absolutely. Hey, I used to work in a bar and I got to say 100%, if you respond to people’s reviews, it really, really makes a difference. And people really respect that. Going to bat and owning things, it’s really underrated. So don’t forget about it, it’s really important. And speaking of underrated things, this eighth thing here is a little bit under the radar. You might not even think about this, but when it comes to adding images to your Google My Business page, you still have the opportunity to treat them like you would on a website where you can optimise those images for SEO. So on the backend, you can create a descriptive title that’s rich, descriptive keyword inclusive. You can add alt texts and you can add geotags. So this would be great and an example of somebody who is serving a specific local population. Say your a restaurant and you post your daily specials on your Google My Business page, you can geotag them with your neighbourhood or your city or your zip code. And so it’ll be more likely to appear for relevant people looking for say, “eggs brunch near me.”

Kate Toon:
So, yeah, that’s a great point. It’s honestly something I don’t do. I think what happens is often you’ll create your Google My Business profile, you’ll add your images when you first do it and then you forget about adding images. We’re going to talk about updating content a little bit later on as well, tip number 10. But a signup study found that local listings with photos are twice as likely to be considered reputable with 35% more clicks. So I think it’s also, I love the idea of the geotags, I think that’s really ingenious. I think it’s also really good quality pictures. And again, your customers might be uploading pictures too, remember your customers can upload pictures. So you want to have a nice balance between the professional picks and the customer picks.

This is a separate thought, but whenever I go onto TripAdvisor and stuff, yeah I love looking at the professional picks, but then I go straight and look at the amateur pics because I want to see how clean was that toilet. Was there a dead bat in the sheets. I don’t know. And you said when you worked at a local restaurant, that that was a massive thing for you, improving your Google My Business?

Daniel Lamb:
Yeah, so responding to critical reviews on Yelp and Google My Business was really important because there was a lot of disinformation. There are spammy bots out there. And so to your point, addressing these things head on creates a positive resonance for your profile and cuts down on any of that spamminess or distrust that might ensue if you have too many negatives without any responses.

Kate Toon:
Yeah. But to the images thing, like uploading your positive images as well can outweigh any negative images that your customers have uploaded. Okay, tip number nine, investigate Google My Business messaging. So people hate the phone. I know I do. I hate ringing out for things. I much prefer to email. And Google My Business introduced the messaging feature a little while ago. You can activate this and communicate one-on-one with your customers. And customers can ask questions by SMS, straight from your listings. So head to your dashboard and click on, turn on messaging.

Now from the students on my courses, I have found it to be they’re a little bit sketchy, but it does work. I managed to have a whole back and forth conversation with a business the other day. I was trying to book a hair appointment. For some reason, I didn’t want a ring. I think it was actually after hours and I didn’t really expect them to respond, but they did. And it works great because they could include links and booking stuff. And it was really smooth. So, don’t expect customers to communicate with you the way that you like to be communicated with. You’d probably prefer to just pick up the phone or book on your online booking system, but no matter how great the booking system is, people are always going to have questions and different things. It gives them an opportunity to chat with you, if they can. So tip number nine, investigate Google My Business. And then our final tip is, I guess it’s all encompassing. It’s like once you’ve done all of this, what next? So tip number 10, Daniel.

Daniel Lamb:
Absolutely. So one of the coolest things that you can do with Google My Business is the post feature. There’s a lot of different ways you can use posts. Some businesses like to use them to send out coupons and offers. So you can go in there and post, “Hey, this week we’re doing a 35% off sale.” You can also use it to build content, like you would on a blog. So this is an opportunity to create just like you would on your website, in a lot of ways. And we’ve seen this work with companies like doctor’s offices, different types of service-based businesses like that, where you’re maybe not putting out offers all the time or products, but you can still use that real estate to describe conditions you treat or procedures that you might perform. And so that has been seen to provide some lists and visibility as well. So never neglect your posts on Google My Business.

Kate Toon:
Yeah and there’s lots of different ways that you can post, you can do, as you said, promos and videos and images and text space. There’s a whole range of things you can do. What I like about it as well is you get great reporting back. So it will tell how people have interacted with that post. You can repost to the previous posts. There’s actually so much to Google Business. You could have done a much longer episode. I really recommend that you just go into the dashboard and have a play, you can’t break anything. There’s other amazing features, like you’re able to create your own review links that you can send out to people. You can turn comments and reviews on your Google My Business into social media graphics that you can then share on social. There is so much you can do. And the more time and energy you put in, the better it’s going to be.

And you know, people say to me, “Oh, if I get a lot of reviews on Google My Business, am I going to rank better in the local pack?” Google says no, but it’s maybe causation and correlation because most of the ones that do rank well do have a lot of reviews. But even if it’s not about the ranking, it definitely impacts click through rates. So, if you Google Kate Toon, copywriter in Sydney, I think I have 200 or so five star reviews. And the person below me has four. Well, who are you going to click on? So just really work for those reviews and don’t be scared of the negative ones. I think that’s an important thing.

Now at the end of the show, Daniel, we always get a few questions from members of my Digital Masterchef’s community. Some of these we’ve covered a little bit already, but we can dig a bit deeper now. So the first question I’m going to throw to you, and it’s from Krystala Charambalous from my Digital Masterchef group, she has a fashion store called Modella and she says, “Are you allowed to have a Google My Business account if you’re an online store only?”

Daniel Lamb:
So this is one of those places where you can technically have a Google My Business account if you set up your address correctly and you address who you serve. They don’t really like people in e-comm to have Google My Business pages, but there’s no implicit rule that you cannot under any circumstances have a Google My Business page. They really like it if you have some sort of physical location where you interact with customers, or if you go out and visit your customers. So say you’re a service-based business. So the answer is, if you set up your account correctly, you can still have a Google My Business page for a digital business. Absolutely.

Kate Toon:
Okay. Well, the next question follows on from that. And again, we’ve covered this a little bit, but we’ll talk about it again. Jennifer Crawford, from Our New Home Coach asks, “How do I best use GMB without divulging my home address to the interwebs?” So the few things I want to just say here. So first of all, you have to put your real address in to get the verification code. That doesn’t mean it has to be shown online. We’ve talked about choosing service areas and not being too greedy. We’ve talked about the potential of using virtual offices, also co-working spaces. If you have an accountant that’s willing to use their address, that might be an option too. But the other thing I would say, let’s not get into too much about the privacy thing. Honestly, these days, it’s probably pretty easy for someone to find your home address if they really want to. It’s probably a few clicks away, you’ve been scraped or crawled, or you’re filled in some form at some point and they’ve been hacked.

So, I guess obviously we don’t want weirdos turning up at our home address. So that’s the main thing. But if this is something you’re really concerned about, do a little bit of googling as well, just to make sure that your home address isn’t already out there. If you’ve registered a domain years ago and he didn’t set up the main privacy, your home address could be there then. I think the question is more like… It’s a weird one, isn’t it Daniel? Do you know what I mean? Because I wouldn’t want everyone knowing my home address, but probably it wouldn’t be too hard for people to find it out.

Daniel Lamb:
Absolutely. I know here in the states you can Google search the registration of a business licence and usually that’s mapped to someone’s home address. So it’s really not hard to find people’s information, to your point. There’s been so many data breaches. There’s so many ways to scrape data. There’s not as much of a danger of having that on there. A lot of small businesses are listed at residential spots and I’ve never heard of anyone having weirdos turn up, but I should probably put a no weirdos sign out on my front lawn.

Kate Toon:
Well then you wouldn’t be able to enter your own house. That would be the difficult thing. I’m sorry. Joking.

Daniel Lamb:
Yeah, it really would be.

Kate Toon:
I just met Daniel and I’m already insulting him, which means I like him. Do you see what I mean? That’s when you know. Next question’s from Gary Cooper and he said, “Somehow I’ve ended up with three Google My Businesses, all at the same address despite repeated requests to Google’s weird customer service system. I know further on and getting two cancelled.” Now I do think that Google My Business customer service is pretty goddamn poor. You only seem to get any kind of luck from them when you’ve done something wrong. Couple of suggestions, Gary, go keyword stuff the crap out of your description. The other thing I’d say is you can just mark that businesses closed. So yes, you’ll have three listings, but two will be marked as closed.

I had that happen. I set up a little office here where I live and it was short lived. I decided I didn’t want to do it. And it’s hung around like a bad smell for ages and I could not get it to go. And it was ranking above my real listing. So in the end I just marked it as closed. And I think after about a year, it disappears because it was like why would we keep showing this closed business? I’m not sure what the exact timescale is, but yeah. How do you deal with issues with Google My Business because it’s hard to get in touch with them, isn’t it?

Daniel Lamb:
Absolutely. Yeah. The things you just mentioned are the things that I’ve done as well. I’ve had clients, who’ve had duplicate profiles on GMB as well, and I’ve reached out to Google on their behalf and I’ve also gotten the cold shoulder. I would say also keep nagging them like the guy from Shawshank Redemption, write a letter a day until they get up and do something about it. But you can also just close those accounts and mark those business as closed, as Kate was saying. It will eventually get deleted off.

Kate Toon:
Yeah. And the next question is also from Gary and I think we’ve covered this, but it’s good to go through again. If there is no category that you fit in, so there is no copywriting category, what would your suggestion be? And I think we say like, go with advertising or marketing or just, I think there are things like business writer, advertising writer, you just… I really think this is interesting because I know that a lot of copywriters that do my course are determined to rank for the word copywriter. And I think it just shows you as a copywriter. That’s kind of an industry term and not necessarily how people outside our industry look at us. They think of us as writers for websites or writers for emails. Copywriter is quite an interesting term. So just find something close enough. Daniel, have you got a final, general piece of advice for our listeners on Google My Business?

Daniel Lamb:
Yeah, absolutely. I would say overall, just take advantage of it and experiment. If you try something and it doesn’t work, you can always change what you have on there. No one’s saying that you can never go back on what category you selected or on what things you’re advertising on there. That’s the beauty of marketing really, is that it’s an experiment. And so let your Google My Business page be an experiment. If you find out that something works really well for you, do more of that. If it’s not working, try something else.

Kate Toon:
Yeah. I totally agree that you can’t break it. I think a lot of people get frightened about Google products because they’re worried that they can break them, you can’t break it. My little final tip would be, in order to avoid what happens with Gary there, if you think, well, yeah, I should set one of these up, go have a quick check that you haven’t already set one up or there isn’t something already there that someone set up is a legacy. I know people that have multiple Gmail accounts, multiple Google Analytics accounts. Just take a little minute to have a little survey of what’s already out there. Google your business name, see what comes up so that you don’t end up duplicating something that already exists. Or your business might already been crawled and a profile created and then what you actually need to do is go and claim the listing, which again is really straightforward. But yeah, you don’t want to be creating duplicate ones.

Well Daniel, That was fantastic. We had the whole gamut of action there. We had dogs, we have berries, we had some great tips as well. Thank you so much for being on the show.

Daniel Lamb:
Thank you, Kate. Thanks for having me.

Kate Toon:
So that’s the end of this week’s show. If you have questions about grappling Google My Business, head to my, I Love SEO group on Facebook. I’d like to end the show with a shout-out to one of my lovely listeners. And it is from VictorBB7 from Australia who says, “Love running while listening to your podcast. Good way to brainstorm and keep up on the online marketing trends. Thanks.” Thank you, Victor. I need to get back into my running. Anyway, thanks to you for listening. If you’ve enjoyed the show, you know the drill, I’d love a review. I’d love a five star rating. It makes me happy, gives me a reason to live in this world and you get a shout-out on the show. Also, don’t forget to check out the show notes where you can see Daniel’s beret and get some useful links and other bits and bolts as well. So that’s the end of this week’s show. This show I think is broadcasting on New Year’s Eve, maybe, or the day before. So I really want to wish you all a really positive and joyful 2021. Let’s hope it’s a little bit better than 2020 and stay safe. And I’ll see you in the new year. Thanks for listening. Bye.